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Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha" as noted by Maharam Shik (cited in sefer hamafteach to talmud torah 1:7). This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Maharam Shik himself however assumes that the obligation to teach students, and presumably one's personal obligation does include the oral law, and therefore doesn't understand Rambam's ruling about teaching specifically the written law.

Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha" as noted by Maharam Shik (cited in sefer hamafteach to talmud torah 1:7). This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Maharam Shik himself however assumes that one's personal obligation does include the oral law, and therefore doesn't understand Rambam's ruling about teaching specifically the written law.

Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha" as noted by Maharam Shik (cited in sefer hamafteach to talmud torah 1:7). This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Maharam Shik himself however assumes that the obligation to teach students, and presumably one's personal obligation does include the oral law, and therefore doesn't understand Rambam's ruling about teaching specifically the written law.

2 added 269 characters in body
source | link

Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha" as noted by Maharam Shik (cited in sefer hamafteach to talmud torah 1:7). This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Maharam Shik himself however assumes that one's personal obligation does include the oral law, and therefore doesn't understand Rambam's ruling about teaching specifically the written law.

Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha". This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha" as noted by Maharam Shik (cited in sefer hamafteach to talmud torah 1:7). This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.

Maharam Shik himself however assumes that one's personal obligation does include the oral law, and therefore doesn't understand Rambam's ruling about teaching specifically the written law.

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Additional evidence that one doesn't fulfill a biblical obligation can be adduced from Rambam's opinion that one is obligated to teach his son specifically the written law (Hil. Talmud Torah 1:7). In general Rambam (e.g. sefer hamitzvos assei 11) parallels the obligations of personal study and teaching ones sons as parts of the commandment "v'shinantem l'vanecha". This would imply that one's personal biblical obligation to study also includes only the written law.