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For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim.

2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib), writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood.

3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites therthere examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitationresuscitation).

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim.

2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib) writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood.

3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites ther examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitation).

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim.

2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba, the Ri ibn Shuib, writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood.

3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites there examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resuscitation).

2 added 4 characters in body
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For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2

2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib) writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood. 3

3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites ther examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitation).

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib) writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood. 3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites ther examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitation).

For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim.

2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib) writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood.

3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites ther examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitation).

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For those who are interested in the views of Rishonim: 1) Many Rishonim have a girsa that explicitly places the tefillah after the sobering; see dikdukei Sofrim. 2) Rishonim do not discuss this. But according to those who understand that he wasnt actually killed, there would obviously be no question. Besides for Meiri (see below) a student of the Rashba (I dont remeber if it is the Toras Hamincha, or the Ri ibn Shuib) writes in drashos to the Torah that he didnt literally kill him, but rather intoxicated him until he threw up vomit that looked like blood. 3) the Meiri (Megillah 7b) says that the word is actually "sachtei" with sin, rather than "shachtei" with a shin. That means he squeezed him (presumably in an act of drunken exuberance), R. Zeira was evidently unnerved, and after tefillah he was reconstituted (Meiri cites ther examples of the root "chayim" meaning rejuvenation rather than literal resucitation).