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The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say this bracha. This is documentedexplanation (specifically, that men say shelo asani isha because women are obligated in fewer mitzvos) appears in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. (B.T. Menahot 43b; JJ.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18). 

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination. Similarly, some argue that women do not need certain mitzvos such as tefillin because they are inherently more spiritual than men. http://www.aish.com/jl/m/w/Women--Mitzvot.html

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos overall to do, but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say this bracha. This is documented in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. (B.T. Menahot 43b; J.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18).

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination.

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say this bracha. This explanation (specifically, that men say shelo asani isha because women are obligated in fewer mitzvos) appears in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and in the Yerushalmi. (J.T. Berakhot 9:1; Tosefta Berakhot 6:18). 

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination. Similarly, some argue that women do not need certain mitzvos such as tefillin because they are inherently more spiritual than men. http://www.aish.com/jl/m/w/Women--Mitzvot.html

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos overall to do, but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

2 correction
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The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say these brachosthis bracha. This is documented in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. .(B.T. Menahot 43b; J.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18).

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination.

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say these brachos. This is documented in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. .(B.T. Menahot 43b; J.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18)

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination.

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say this bracha. This is documented in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. (B.T. Menahot 43b; J.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18).

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination.

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).

1
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The reason is that women are obligated in fewer mitzvos than men. The same for slaves and non-Jews. So Jewish men thank Hashem for not making them women, non-Jews, or slaves, because we should be happy to have more opportunities for serving Hashem, rather than seeing it as a burden.

This is not a newfangled feminist interpretation. This is the original reasoning for why we say these brachos. This is documented in the tosefta, which dates from before the Gemara was compiled, and is also discussed in both Talmud Bavli and the Yerushalmi. .(B.T. Menahot 43b; J.T. Berakhot 9:1; and Tosefta Berakhot 6:18)

The fact that men have to do more mitzvos does not mean men are better -- on the contrary, some have argued that men need more mitzvos because men have a stronger evil inclination.

I would also note that even if women have quantitatively fewer mitzvos which they are obligated to perform, this does not mean at all that the total number of mitzvos and maasim tovim that they accomplish will be less than a man. She might have fewer mitzvos but she could do them more often (which I think women often do, given the countless acts of gemilus chasadim involved in care work, chesed volunteerism, and the helping professions).