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Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sistershow could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

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Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

Shabbat Shalom.

Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

Shabbat Shalom.

Every year, I see questions and answers regarding how could Ya'akov marry two sisters, etc. but it struck me this year that one thing I've never seen is the question whether Ya'akov was right to marry Rachel after he'd married Leah.

My initial thoughts were that the pesukim emphasise that Ya'akov loved Rachel and that it would be "unfair" for him not to marry her but why should this be relevant? There are many times when we find ourselves in situations which require us to give up what we'd prefer.

My second thoughts were that there are a whole bunch of midrashim which work based on the idea that the Avot and Imahot were navi'im and thus they knew there were going to be 12 tribes, etc. but now that I think about it, I've never seen a midrash which says that Ya'akov knew he was going to marry 4 wives or that he had to. Occasionally I've heard the statement that Ya'akov was going to marry Leah afterwards anyway and the only thing which Lavan did was effect the order but I've never seen a solid source for that idea and it really jars with the pesukim.

Given how much pain and suffering was caused by his marrying Rachel after Leah, in his own life, his children's lives (i.e. Yosef) and in Jewish history (i.e. split kingdoms etc.), was it healthy for him to do so and if yes, why?

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