5 obviously the premise reflects "my understanding" so I trimmed the fat
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I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) My understanding is that theThe sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could NOT choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath. Any law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

EPILOGUE: People are asking for citations for these premises, when I clearly disclosed that I lack them. Rather, I'd appreciate responses that employ citations to support or contradict them. For example, those saying that premise 1 is false: Jerusalem is NOT a holy city? I think I've heard religious people use the phrase "eer kadosh." Premise 2 is literally what I've been told by a Rabbi.

I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) My understanding is that the sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could NOT choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath. Any law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

EPILOGUE: People are asking for citations for these premises, when I clearly disclosed that I lack them. Rather, I'd appreciate responses that employ citations to support or contradict them. For example, those saying that premise 1 is false: Jerusalem is NOT a holy city? I think I've heard religious people use the phrase "eer kadosh." Premise 2 is literally what I've been told by a Rabbi.

I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) The sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could NOT choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath. Any law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

EPILOGUE: People are asking for citations for these premises, when I clearly disclosed that I lack them. Rather, I'd appreciate responses that employ citations to support or contradict them. For example, those saying that premise 1 is false: Jerusalem is NOT a holy city? I think I've heard religious people use the phrase "eer kadosh." Premise 2 is literally what I've been told by a Rabbi.

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    Post Reopened by Yishai, Y     e     z, Isaac Moses, Monica Cellio
4 made the title pop
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questions regarding the holiness of Is Jerusalem, idolatry, worth fighting and dying for in the sanctitycontext of human lifeJewish law?

3 people are hung up on the wording of this premise
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I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) My understanding is that the sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could NOT choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath, but they are not obligated to. Most-anyAny law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood, and not because G-d said it was holy ground like with Moshe approaching the Burning Bush.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

EPILOGUE: People are asking for citations for these premises, when I clearly disclosed that I lack them. Rather, I'd appreciate responses that employ citations to support or contradict them. For example, those saying that premise 1 is false: Jerusalem is NOT a holy city? I think I've heard religious people use the phrase "eer kadosh." Premise 2 is literally what I've been told by a Rabbi.

I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) My understanding is that the sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath, but they are not obligated to. Most-any law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood, and not because G-d said it was holy ground like with Moshe approaching the Burning Bush.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

I think I have a good Jewish education but I don't know much Talmud, and so for all of my premises below, I would appreciate if a Talmud scholar would help with any pertinent references.

Premise 0) My understanding is that the sanctity of human life has the highest priority in halacha. For example, one could NOT choose to martyr themselves rather than to desecrate the Sabbath. Any law can be broken to preserve human life.

Premise 1) Jerusalem is a holy city because it is where the Temple stood.

Premise 2) A Jew is prohibited from prostrating before an idol or building one. We pray towards Jerusalem to remember the Exile, not because a holy artifact remains there.

Question: So is the willingness to fight and die for Jerusalem, to prioritize a material object over human life, against the spirit of Jewish law?

EPILOGUE: People are asking for citations for these premises, when I clearly disclosed that I lack them. Rather, I'd appreciate responses that employ citations to support or contradict them. For example, those saying that premise 1 is false: Jerusalem is NOT a holy city? I think I've heard religious people use the phrase "eer kadosh." Premise 2 is literally what I've been told by a Rabbi.

2 deleted 116 characters in body
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    Post Closed as "Needs details or clarity" by DanF, MTL, Double AA
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