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Assuming that a reusable glass bottle would need tevila if you choose to keep it for long term use, which may or not be true, but lets start with that assumption.

In order to change a nonjewish made keli into a jewish made keli in order to nullify the need for tevila, a two step process is necessary according to the Shach in Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff kattan 21 & Pischei Tshuva there s.k. 1.

Step 1. The kli must be made unusable from its original state. Such as making a hole in it where it can no longer hold a reviis (around 3.5 onces).

Step 2. A Jew now makes it usable. Such as plugging the hole.

I am not sure how exactly you make your glasses, i.e. do you keep the bottom part? The neck part? Do you then melt or glue them together? If you feel that the above requirements are satisfied, than enjoy your new tevila-less glasses.

One more side point is I have seen in the name of Rav Elyashev that the work done to alter the keli must qualify as maaseh uman, skilled labor, not something the average person would normally do. It seems your case fills this requirement.

Edit. This is all going with the assumption that a regular wine bottle as is would need tevila for future use. There is a tshuva in the Igros Moshe (as mentioned by @Ish Plony in the comments) in Yoreh De'ah 2 #137 in the second to last subject where he says a kli com a food item can be batul to the food if it is not a fancy kli. It would then not need tevila for reuse, even left as is. He does not discuss altering it. This should cover all wine bottles and most whisk bottles as well.

Assuming that a reusable glass bottle would need tevila if you choose to keep it for long term use, which may or not be true, but lets start with that assumption.

In order to change a nonjewish made keli into a jewish made keli in order to nullify the need for tevila, a two step process is necessary according to the Shach in Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff kattan 21 & Pischei Tshuva there s.k. 1.

Step 1. The kli must be made unusable from its original state. Such as making a hole in it where it can no longer hold a reviis (around 3.5 onces).

Step 2. A Jew now makes it usable. Such as plugging the hole.

I am not sure how exactly you make your glasses, i.e. do you keep the bottom part? The neck part? Do you then melt or glue them together? If you feel that the above requirements are satisfied, than enjoy your new tevila-less glasses.

One more side point is I have seen in the name of Rav Elyashev that the work done to alter the keli must qualify as maaseh uman, skilled labor, not something the average person would normally do. It seems your case fills this requirement.

Assuming that a reusable glass bottle would need tevila if you choose to keep it for long term use, which may or not be true, but lets start with that assumption.

In order to change a nonjewish made keli into a jewish made keli in order to nullify the need for tevila, a two step process is necessary according to the Shach in Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff kattan 21 & Pischei Tshuva there s.k. 1.

Step 1. The kli must be made unusable from its original state. Such as making a hole in it where it can no longer hold a reviis (around 3.5 onces).

Step 2. A Jew now makes it usable. Such as plugging the hole.

I am not sure how exactly you make your glasses, i.e. do you keep the bottom part? The neck part? Do you then melt or glue them together? If you feel that the above requirements are satisfied, than enjoy your new tevila-less glasses.

One more side point is I have seen in the name of Rav Elyashev that the work done to alter the keli must qualify as maaseh uman, skilled labor, not something the average person would normally do. It seems your case fills this requirement.

Edit. This is all going with the assumption that a regular wine bottle as is would need tevila for future use. There is a tshuva in the Igros Moshe (as mentioned by @Ish Plony in the comments) in Yoreh De'ah 2 #137 in the second to last subject where he says a kli com a food item can be batul to the food if it is not a fancy kli. It would then not need tevila for reuse, even left as is. He does not discuss altering it. This should cover all wine bottles and most whisk bottles as well.

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Assuming that a reusable glass bottle would need tevila if you choose to keep it for long term use, which may or not be true, but lets start with that assumption.

In order to change a nonjewish made keli into a jewish made keli in order to nullify the need for tevila, a two step process is necessary according to the Shach in Yoreh Deah siman 120 siff kattan 21 & Pischei Tshuva there s.k. 1.

Step 1. The kli must be made unusable from its original state. Such as making a hole in it where it can no longer hold a reviis (around 3.5 onces).

Step 2. A Jew now makes it usable. Such as plugging the hole.

I am not sure how exactly you make your glasses, i.e. do you keep the bottom part? The neck part? Do you then melt or glue them together? If you feel that the above requirements are satisfied, than enjoy your new tevila-less glasses.

One more side point is I have seen in the name of Rav Elyashev that the work done to alter the keli must qualify as maaseh uman, skilled labor, not something the average person would normally do. It seems your case fills this requirement.