4 teimanim aren't sefardim...
source | link

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, except for Teimanim, who actually do this, whether at home or in restaurants (though some Teimanim do). So for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any modern day rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, except for Teimanim, who actually do this, whether at home or in restaurants. So for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any modern day rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim who actually do this, whether at home or in restaurants (though some Teimanim do). So for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any modern day rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

3 added 40 characters in body
source | link

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, at home or in restaurantsexcept for Teimanim, who actually do this, sowhether at home or in restaurants. So for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any modern day rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, at home or in restaurants, who actually do this, so for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, except for Teimanim, who actually do this, whether at home or in restaurants. So for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any modern day rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

2 added 1112 characters in body
source | link

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, at home or in restaurants, who actually do this, so for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

Raw, unsalted meat is completely kosher. Just rinse and eat. Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah siman 67 siff 2.

EDIT. The Shach in siman 76 s.k. 2 also point out that unsalted roasted meat even if only rare is also permitted to eat. The point of my original answer was to dispel any misconceptions about blood, but this edit will answer the assumed question more directly as pointed out in the comments.

One more point of clarification as pertaining to cooked, not roasted meat, is after salting the red juice is not considered blood,but called mohel, as pointed out by Monica. This is the Ashkenazi law lichatchila. For Sfardim however, if possible they should be putting the raw salted and washed meat into boiling, not warm or cold, water in order to seal in the red juice which the Rambam did in fact consider blood, and the Shulchan Aruch says to take into account, when possible. See siman 69 siff 19. This is process is called chalita.

I don't know any Sfardim, at home or in restaurants, who actually do this, so for all Acheinu bnei Hamizrach please comment or quote any rulings, but this is what the Shulchan Aruch says and some people reading this question and these answers might find this interesting.

    Post Undeleted by msh210
    Post Deleted by Gershon Gold, msh210
1
source | link