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by Rabbi Yechezkel Fox

Three Hints to Chanukah

As this parsha usually falls out the same time as Chanukah, we shall try and make the connection between them.

The Greeks made three decrees against the Jews: Kiddush HaChodesh (sanctifying the new moon at the beginning of the month), Mila (circumcision) and Shabbos. To remind us of the eternity of the Jewish people and that our connection to the mitzvot can never be broken, all three of these mizvot are hinted at in the parsha.

Kiddush HaChodeshSee: When Pharaoh summoned Yosef to interpret his dream, (Ch.41/14) it was Rosh HaShana, which, of course, is at the beginning of the month of Tishrei.

Mila: When the Egyptians started to feel the pains of hunger, the verse says: All the land of Egypt hungered, and the people cried to Pharaoh for bread. So Pharaoh said to all of Egypt,”Go to Yosef. Whatever he says to you, you should do”. Ch.41/55

Rashi comments: For Yosef had told them that they should have themselves circumcised.

Shabbos: At the end of the parsha, Yosef had his goblet planted in the sack of Binyomin. Then the verse says, They had left the city, they had not gone far, and Yosef said to the one in charge of his house, “Arise, chase after them, you shall say to them, “Why do you repay evil for good?” Ch.44/4

The question is asked: How could Yosef play this trick on them when he could be risking the life of his own father and all the families of his brothers? By delaying them he may be starving them to death. The Chanukas HaTorah answers that Yosef sent his brothers off on Shabbos. Only if it was a life threatening situation would they be able to continue their journey beyond the city limits, otherwise they would be prohibited by the laws of Shabbos. Yoseph’s messenger was given specific instructions to wait to see whether they went beyond the city limit. If they did, then he would have to let them continue. However, he found that they had not gone far, for they were waiting at the city limit.

http://www.e-geress.org/2010/11/29/parshas-mikeitz/

by Rabbi Yechezkel Fox

Three Hints to Chanukah

As this parsha usually falls out the same time as Chanukah, we shall try and make the connection between them.

The Greeks made three decrees against the Jews: Kiddush HaChodesh (sanctifying the new moon at the beginning of the month), Mila (circumcision) and Shabbos. To remind us of the eternity of the Jewish people and that our connection to the mitzvot can never be broken, all three of these mizvot are hinted at in the parsha.

Kiddush HaChodesh: When Pharaoh summoned Yosef to interpret his dream, (Ch.41/14) it was Rosh HaShana, which, of course, is at the beginning of the month of Tishrei.

Mila: When the Egyptians started to feel the pains of hunger, the verse says: All the land of Egypt hungered, and the people cried to Pharaoh for bread. So Pharaoh said to all of Egypt,”Go to Yosef. Whatever he says to you, you should do”. Ch.41/55

Rashi comments: For Yosef had told them that they should have themselves circumcised.

Shabbos: At the end of the parsha, Yosef had his goblet planted in the sack of Binyomin. Then the verse says, They had left the city, they had not gone far, and Yosef said to the one in charge of his house, “Arise, chase after them, you shall say to them, “Why do you repay evil for good?” Ch.44/4

The question is asked: How could Yosef play this trick on them when he could be risking the life of his own father and all the families of his brothers? By delaying them he may be starving them to death. The Chanukas HaTorah answers that Yosef sent his brothers off on Shabbos. Only if it was a life threatening situation would they be able to continue their journey beyond the city limits, otherwise they would be prohibited by the laws of Shabbos. Yoseph’s messenger was given specific instructions to wait to see whether they went beyond the city limit. If they did, then he would have to let them continue. However, he found that they had not gone far, for they were waiting at the city limit.

http://www.e-geress.org/2010/11/29/parshas-mikeitz/

See: http://www.e-geress.org/2010/11/29/parshas-mikeitz/

1
source | link

by Rabbi Yechezkel Fox

Three Hints to Chanukah

As this parsha usually falls out the same time as Chanukah, we shall try and make the connection between them.

The Greeks made three decrees against the Jews: Kiddush HaChodesh (sanctifying the new moon at the beginning of the month), Mila (circumcision) and Shabbos. To remind us of the eternity of the Jewish people and that our connection to the mitzvot can never be broken, all three of these mizvot are hinted at in the parsha.

Kiddush HaChodesh: When Pharaoh summoned Yosef to interpret his dream, (Ch.41/14) it was Rosh HaShana, which, of course, is at the beginning of the month of Tishrei.

Mila: When the Egyptians started to feel the pains of hunger, the verse says: All the land of Egypt hungered, and the people cried to Pharaoh for bread. So Pharaoh said to all of Egypt,”Go to Yosef. Whatever he says to you, you should do”. Ch.41/55

Rashi comments: For Yosef had told them that they should have themselves circumcised.

Shabbos: At the end of the parsha, Yosef had his goblet planted in the sack of Binyomin. Then the verse says, They had left the city, they had not gone far, and Yosef said to the one in charge of his house, “Arise, chase after them, you shall say to them, “Why do you repay evil for good?” Ch.44/4

The question is asked: How could Yosef play this trick on them when he could be risking the life of his own father and all the families of his brothers? By delaying them he may be starving them to death. The Chanukas HaTorah answers that Yosef sent his brothers off on Shabbos. Only if it was a life threatening situation would they be able to continue their journey beyond the city limits, otherwise they would be prohibited by the laws of Shabbos. Yoseph’s messenger was given specific instructions to wait to see whether they went beyond the city limit. If they did, then he would have to let them continue. However, he found that they had not gone far, for they were waiting at the city limit.

http://www.e-geress.org/2010/11/29/parshas-mikeitz/