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First of all, I've upvoted YEZ's answer, as the idea of relating ה to femininity is not related to the letter itself, but to its grammatical function.

There are several other examples of cases which I believe answer your question, though besides for YEZ's example, I can only think of one right away: the Maharal (Netzach Yisrael ch. 13), in context of explaining why there's no pasuk in Psalm 145 (colloquially known as Ashrei) that begins with the letter נ is because it represents falling - not merely because it is the first letter in the word נפילה, but because of a grammatical rule, that the נ, if beginning a shoresh, is left out in certain verb forms (for example, almost all future tenses of the verb 'fall' don't include the נ of the shoresh - the נ itself 'falls away').

First of all, I've upvoted YEZ's answer, as the idea of relating ה to femininity is not related to the letter itself, but to its grammatical function.

There are several other examples of cases which I believe answer your question, though besides for YEZ's example, I can only think of one right away: the Maharal (Netzach Yisrael ch. 13), in context of explaining why there's no pasuk in Psalm 145 (colloquially known as Ashrei) that begins with the letter נ is because it represents falling - not merely because it is the first letter in the word נפילה, but because of a grammatical rule, that the נ, if beginning a shoresh, is left out in certain verb forms (for example, all future tenses of the verb 'fall' don't include the נ of the shoresh - the נ itself 'falls away').

First of all, I've upvoted YEZ's answer, as the idea of relating ה to femininity is not related to the letter itself, but to its grammatical function.

There are several other examples of cases which I believe answer your question, though besides for YEZ's example, I can only think of one right away: the Maharal (Netzach Yisrael ch. 13), in context of explaining why there's no pasuk in Psalm 145 (colloquially known as Ashrei) that begins with the letter נ is because it represents falling - not merely because it is the first letter in the word נפילה, but because of a grammatical rule, that the נ, if beginning a shoresh, is left out in certain verb forms (for example, almost all future tenses of the verb 'fall' don't include the נ of the shoresh - the נ itself 'falls away').

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First of all, I've upvoted YEZ's answer, as the idea of relating ה to femininity is not related to the letter itself, but to its grammatical function.

There are several other examples of cases which I believe answer your question, though besides for YEZ's example, I can only think of one right away: the Maharal (Netzach Yisrael ch. 13), in context of explaining why there's no pasuk in Psalm 145 (colloquially known as Ashrei) that begins with the letter נ is because it represents falling - not merely because it is the first letter in the word נפילה, but because of a grammatical rule, that the נ, if beginning a shoresh, is left out in certain verb forms (for example, all future tenses of the verb 'fall' don't include the נ of the shoresh - the נ itself 'falls away').