3 Hopefully clear some things up from the comments discussion by providing the contrast
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Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

Before Torah She Baal Peh was written down, the Yeshiva had to teach the student the whole thing and get them to memorize it. Now that it is written down the goal has changed to enabling the student to read and understand it, continuing the study of it after they graduate.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

Before Torah She Baal Peh was written down, the Yeshiva had to teach the student the whole thing and get them to memorize it. Now that it is written down the goal has changed to enabling the student to read and understand it, continuing the study of it after they graduate.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

2 envy not elegy
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Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קינתקנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קינת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קנאת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.

1
source | link

Yeshivos start learning Gemara too early (the Maharal said this already many centuries ago). However, the overall goal of the Yeshiva curriculum is to train the student to be able to learn Torah She Baal Peh on their own in their lifetimes - specifically the 613 Mitvos and their details.

The main key to that level of learning is the Talmud Bavli. Without being able to learn that, there is no way to be able to learn more.

Of course curriculum will vary in how they get there and additional goals they want to teach students. But the Talmud Bavli part is about that "learning how to learn" process. Learning Halachos alone will not enable that.

(One Source which discusses this goal of Yeshiva learning is Hilchos Talmud Torah by the Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch).

The above should not be taken as an endorsement of a specific curriculum, or a specific amount of time spent. There is no one right answer in how to achieve that goal, and קינת סופרים תרבה חכמה - competition in schooling increases scholarship.