9 Found earlier source
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The first source for that expression is Kli Yakarthe Alshich - 1602first published 1593, but likely said significantly earlier. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

As far as I know, the first source for this specific expression of the idea is in the Kli YakarAlshich (first published in 16021593, but based on drashos he would have given over time), in a few places. One reference is here. The Kli Yakar (published 1602) also has several mentions of it, one is Bereishis 1:31 and another is Bereishis 9:20.

The author of the שפע טל is the nephew of Rabbi Yishaya Horowitz, better known as the Shaloh HaKadosh. In his Sefer (Part 1, Bais Chachma towards the end) he says "You already know the Neshama is a Chelek Elokah Mimal". This was printed later than the שפע טל (well after the Shaloh HaKadosh had passed away), although it seems quite possible that the author of the שפע טל got this from his uncle.

The first source for that expression is Kli Yakar - 1602. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

As far as I know, the first source for this specific expression of the idea is in the Kli Yakar (first published in 1602), in a few places. One is Bereishis 1:31 and another is Bereishis 9:20.

The author of the שפע טל is the nephew of Rabbi Yishaya Horowitz, better known as the Shaloh HaKadosh. In his Sefer (Part 1, Bais Chachma towards the end) he says "You already know the Neshama is a Chelek Elokah Mimal". This was printed later than the שפע טל (well after the Shaloh HaKadosh had passed away), although it seems quite possible that the author of the שפע טל got this from his uncle.

The first source for that expression is the Alshich - first published 1593, but likely said significantly earlier. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

As far as I know, the first source for this specific expression of the idea is in the Alshich (first published in 1593, but based on drashos he would have given over time), in a few places. One reference is here. The Kli Yakar (published 1602) also has several mentions of it, one is Bereishis 1:31 and another is Bereishis 9:20.

The author of the שפע טל is the nephew of Rabbi Yishaya Horowitz, better known as the Shaloh HaKadosh. In his Sefer (Part 1, Bais Chachma towards the end) he says "You already know the Neshama is a Chelek Elokah Mimal". This was printed later than the שפע טל (well after the Shaloh HaKadosh had passed away).

8 added 3 characters in body
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The first source for that expression is שפע טלKli Yakar - 16121602. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

The first source for that expression is שפע טל - 1612. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

The first source for that expression is Kli Yakar - 1602. The concept is older. According to Tanya it means that the soul uniquely feels itself inseparable from G-d, more so than other things that exist in creation.

7 added 13 characters in body
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As far as I know the first appearance of the famous addition of the word "mamash" that is inknown from Tanya at the beginning of chapter two is in a sefer called שפע טל, by Rabbi Shabtai Shefel Horowitz published in 1612. In the first paragraph of the introduction he writes:

As far as I know the first appearance of the famous addition of the word "mamash" is in Tanya at the beginning of chapter two is in a sefer called שפע טל, by Rabbi Shabtai Shefel Horowitz published in 1612. In the first paragraph of the introduction he writes:

As far as I know the first appearance of the famous addition of the word "mamash" that is known from Tanya at the beginning of chapter two is in a sefer called שפע טל, by Rabbi Shabtai Shefel Horowitz published in 1612. In the first paragraph of the introduction he writes:

6 Add earlier reference
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5 Possible earlier source, plus some reference to the earlier idea.
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4 Add summary, apparently the message is getting lost in the length of the answer.
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3 Add publication date per Wikipedia
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2 added 6 characters in body
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1
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