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There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable change is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict laws of mourning are similar to those done during the 9 days such as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from music would be considered a form of "mourning" in the strict technical sense. Tachanun, BTW, is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable change is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict laws of mourning are similar to those done during the 9 days such as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from music would be considered a form of "mourning" in the strict technical sense. Tachanun, BTW, is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable change is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict laws of mourning are similar to those done during the 9 days such as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from music would be considered a form of "mourning" in the strict technical sense. Tachanun, BTW, is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

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There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable chanegchange is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the shulchan aruchShulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict laws of mouringmourning are similar to those done during the 9 dyas uschdays such as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from usicmusic would be considered a form of "mourning" in the technical strict technical sense. Tachanun, BTW, is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable chaneg is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the shulchan aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally the strict laws of mouring are similar to those done during the 9 dyas usch as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from usic would be considered a form of "mourning" in the technical strict sense. Tachanun, BTW is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable change is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally, the strict laws of mourning are similar to those done during the 9 days such as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from music would be considered a form of "mourning" in the strict technical sense. Tachanun, BTW, is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

2 link with background info
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There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable chaneg is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the shulchan aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (There is an opinion that states that after the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this minhag.After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally the strict laws of mouring are similar to those done during the 9 dyas usch as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from usic would be considered a form of "mourning" in the technical strict sense. Tachanun, BTW is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable chaneg is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the shulchan aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (There is an opinion that states that after the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this minhag.) Generally the strict laws of mouring are similar to those done during the 9 dyas usch as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from usic would be considered a form of "mourning" in the technical strict sense. Tachanun, BTW is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

There are various "degrees" of "mourning". Generally, the most noticeable chaneg is refraining from hearing music, which, BTW, is not a minhag mentioned in the shulchan aruch. It developed years later and has become a common minhag. (After the destruction of the Bet Hamikdash, one should NEVER listen to music. Few follow this halacha.) Generally the strict laws of mouring are similar to those done during the 9 dyas usch as not eating meat, not drinking wine, etc. I'm not sure that refraining from usic would be considered a form of "mourning" in the technical strict sense. Tachanun, BTW is not said during both happy occasions as well as sad occasions - it's not said in a mourner's house. So Tachanun cannot be used as your example of implying that it's ommitted only because of happy occasions.

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