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From vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎

[Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a limitation. (See Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta vol. II 43:4 and fn. 22.)

Rav Neuwirth, in his Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta, rules that one who lights with electric lights, has valid backing among poskim, and should recite a berakha on this lighting.

This would make a strong case for people in dorms or other fire-hazardous situations. (A fluorescent bulb might not do, since it has no filament and is therefore less like a fire.)http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc

Furthermore, it would be advisable that in the modern day household, where the true benefit is derived more from the bulbs than the flames, that one have intention for BOTH when reciting the berakha. – Mordechai Friedman, ed.]

Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a limitation. (See Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta vol. II 43:4 and fn. 22.)

Rav Neuwirth, in his Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta, rules that one who lights with electric lights, has valid backing among poskim, and should recite a berakha on this lighting.

This would make a strong case for people in dorms or other fire-hazardous situations. (A fluorescent bulb might not do, since it has no filament and is therefore less like a fire.)

Furthermore, it would be advisable that in the modern day household, where the true benefit is derived more from the bulbs than the flames, that one have intention for BOTH when reciting the berakha. – Mordechai Friedman, ed.

From vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎

[Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a limitation. (See Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta vol. II 43:4 and fn. 22.)

Rav Neuwirth, in his Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta, rules that one who lights with electric lights, has valid backing among poskim, and should recite a berakha on this lighting.

This would make a strong case for people in dorms or other fire-hazardous situations. (A fluorescent bulb might not do, since it has no filament and is therefore less like a fire.)

Furthermore, it would be advisable that in the modern day household, where the true benefit is derived more from the bulbs than the flames, that one have intention for BOTH when reciting the berakha. – Mordechai Friedman, ed.]

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc

Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a limitation. (See Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta vol. II 43:4 and fn. 22.)

Rav Neuwirth, in his Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta, rules that one who lights with electric lights, has valid backing among poskim, and should recite a berakha on this lighting.

This would make a strong case for people in dorms or other fire-hazardous situations. (A fluorescent bulb might not do, since it has no filament and is therefore less like a fire.)

Furthermore, it would be advisable that in the modern day household, where the true benefit is derived more from the bulbs than the flames, that one have intention for BOTH when reciting the berakha. – Mordechai Friedman, ed.

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From vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎

[Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a limitation. (See Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta vol. II 43:4 and fn. 22.)

Rav Neuwirth, in his Shemirat Shabbat Ke-Hilkheta, rules that one who lights with electric lights, has valid backing among poskim, and should recite a berakha on this lighting.

This would make a strong case for people in dorms or other fire-hazardous situations. (A fluorescent bulb might not do, since it has no filament and is therefore less like a fire.)

Furthermore, it would be advisable that in the modern day household, where the true benefit is derived more from the bulbs than the flames, that one have intention for BOTH when reciting the berakha. – Mordechai Friedman, ed.]