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There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms are Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well knowknown for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms are Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well know for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms are Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well known for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

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There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms isare Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well know for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms is Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well know for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms are Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well know for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.

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There are different groups/individuals who discuss these ideas. Certainly, this use of the term "energy" has nothing to do with the scientific definition of the word. This "energy" idea has pagan roots and is known by many different names- In Hinduism the terms prana and chakra are used. In Chinese systems the terms is Chi or Qi. And there are many other variants. Most major poskim (rabbis who are expert in practical Jewish law) have expressed concerns with these ideas/methods and some have forbidden to be involved with them.

See here for example for a decision against the use of various "energy" medicines by Rabbis Yisroel Belsky, Shmuel Auerbach and Dovid Feinstein. And see here from Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv:

אין היתר להשתמש ברפואות אלטרנטיביות שמקורם בדעות עובדי עבודה זרה ויסודם בפעולת כחות לא טבעיים ־ אלא אם כין אפשר להוכיח שהוא עובד בדרך ״הטבע״ בדרכי הבירור, ולא סגי בכך שהעוסקים ברפואות אלו מאמינים שהוא ״טבע״. ויש לחוש בזה משום קוסם קסמים מעונן ומנחש, או משום דרכי האמורי. וקל וחומר אם לא השמיטו מכלל הלימודים את חלק הע״ז שבדבר, שיש בזה איסורי ע״ז

Rabbi Moshe Tendler is well know for being against unproven alternative medicine and probably forbids "energy" medicine as well.

The most pertinent aspect of Jewish law here is the prohibition against superstitious practices. That is codified in Shulchan Aruch, OC:301. The basic idea is that unproven (or perhaps dis-proven) remedies which are not based on science are forbidden. There are also may be other prohibitions involved, including divination and idolatry. (I need not mention the general obligation to guard ones health, and seek out medical intention in case of illness.)

Of course, there are subtleties involved and this answer is not meant to substitute for a competent rabbi's decision. Be sure to ask a rabbi who knows the subject well, as many people are simply unaware of the pagan roots of some alternative medicine and may be unaware of the medical literature that has proven them ineffective.