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There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.


Tosafot on Avoda Zarah 31b, D"H V’tarvayhu mymay be relevant to this question. In the second answer, Tosafot says that the grain in the beer is inconsequential in relation to the water, both when it comes to the blessing made and with regards to Bishul Akum. (An article from the OU brings this Tosafot and says that the Pri Chadash extends this to coffee and tea as well).

Perhaps we can extend this to our case as well. The water in the beer is the main thing, and therefore this bread is Hamotzi. On the other hand, perhaps you could argue that Tosafot is talking about the making of the beer, but once it is already beer, it is now considered beer and not water.

There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.


Tosafot on Avoda Zarah 31b, D"H V’tarvayhu my be relevant to this question. In the second answer, Tosafot says that the grain in the beer is inconsequential in relation to the water, both when it comes to the blessing made and with regards to Bishul Akum. (An article from the OU brings this Tosafot and says that the Pri Chadash extends this to coffee and tea as well).

Perhaps we can extend this to our case as well. The water in the beer is the main thing, and therefore this bread is Hamotzi. On the other hand, perhaps you could argue that Tosafot is talking about the making of the beer, but once it is already beer, it is now considered beer and not water.

There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.


Tosafot on Avoda Zarah 31b, D"H V’tarvayhu may be relevant to this question. In the second answer, Tosafot says that the grain in the beer is inconsequential in relation to the water, both when it comes to the blessing made and with regards to Bishul Akum. (An article from the OU brings this Tosafot and says that the Pri Chadash extends this to coffee and tea as well).

Perhaps we can extend this to our case as well. The water in the beer is the main thing, and therefore this bread is Hamotzi. On the other hand, perhaps you could argue that Tosafot is talking about the making of the beer, but once it is already beer, it is now considered beer and not water.

3 added tosafot and possible relevance to the question
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There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.


Tosafot on Avoda Zarah 31b, D"H V’tarvayhu my be relevant to this question. In the second answer, Tosafot says that the grain in the beer is inconsequential in relation to the water, both when it comes to the blessing made and with regards to Bishul Akum. (An article from the OU brings this Tosafot and says that the Pri Chadash extends this to coffee and tea as well).

Perhaps we can extend this to our case as well. The water in the beer is the main thing, and therefore this bread is Hamotzi. On the other hand, perhaps you could argue that Tosafot is talking about the making of the beer, but once it is already beer, it is now considered beer and not water.

There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.

There are recipes for beer bread online.

The recipes I've seen have no water in them. Instead beer is used in place of water (and yeast).

Is such a bread Hamotzi (we're not discussing a case where enough is eaten that Hamotzi would be made even if the bread is not Hamotzi)?

Please bring sources that discuss this.


Tosafot on Avoda Zarah 31b, D"H V’tarvayhu my be relevant to this question. In the second answer, Tosafot says that the grain in the beer is inconsequential in relation to the water, both when it comes to the blessing made and with regards to Bishul Akum. (An article from the OU brings this Tosafot and says that the Pri Chadash extends this to coffee and tea as well).

Perhaps we can extend this to our case as well. The water in the beer is the main thing, and therefore this bread is Hamotzi. On the other hand, perhaps you could argue that Tosafot is talking about the making of the beer, but once it is already beer, it is now considered beer and not water.

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