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Why do some saytransliterate "Balaam" when the text saysHebrew is "Bilaam"?

I've noticed that most translations render the gentile prophet's name Balaam, while the Hebrew is Bilaam (difference in first vowel). JPS does this in its translation, and people even do it here on Mi Yodeya. I understand that names sometimes get transformed on their way into English-language discourse (like Yitzchak to Isaac) and I don't know why, but Bilaam to Balaam seems a particularly minor transformation -- but a transformation nonetheless. Why does that one vowel get changed so much? Is there some place where the text renders itHebrew is Balaam?

Why do some say "Balaam" when the text says "Bilaam"?

I've noticed that most translations render the gentile prophet's name Balaam, while the Hebrew is Bilaam (difference in first vowel). JPS does this in its translation, and people even do it here on Mi Yodeya. I understand that names sometimes get transformed on their way into English-language discourse (like Yitzchak to Isaac) and I don't know why, but Bilaam to Balaam seems a particularly minor transformation -- but a transformation nonetheless. Why does that one vowel get changed so much? Is there some place where the text renders it Balaam?

Why do some transliterate "Balaam" when the Hebrew is "Bilaam"?

I've noticed that most translations render the gentile prophet's name Balaam, while the Hebrew is Bilaam (difference in first vowel). JPS does this in its translation, and people even do it here on Mi Yodeya. I understand that names sometimes get transformed on their way into English-language discourse (like Yitzchak to Isaac) and I don't know why, but Bilaam to Balaam seems a particularly minor transformation -- but a transformation nonetheless. Why does that one vowel get changed so much? Is there some place where the Hebrew is Balaam?

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Why do some say "Balaam" when the text says "Bilaam"?

I've noticed that most translations render the gentile prophet's name Balaam, while the Hebrew is Bilaam (difference in first vowel). JPS does this in its translation, and people even do it here on Mi Yodeya. I understand that names sometimes get transformed on their way into English-language discourse (like Yitzchak to Isaac) and I don't know why, but Bilaam to Balaam seems a particularly minor transformation -- but a transformation nonetheless. Why does that one vowel get changed so much? Is there some place where the text renders it Balaam?