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The Gemara simply talks about a kohen washing hands. It's the Zohar that says a Levi should do it.

If no Levi is available, the job is given to a firstborn; if no firstborn is available, the kohen just washes his own hands.

I strongly suspect that if the Levi doesn't want to do it, just ignore him and go find a firstborn.

(Conflict-of-interest disclaimer -- I am a non-Levite firstborn, and don't get a lot of kohen-washing business!)

Chayei Adam 32:8:

Ritually impure hands [disqualify]; how so? A Kohen who hasn't washed his hands is prohibited [from doing the blessings] ... and a Levi pours the water. If no Levi is available, a mother's-firstborn, naturally-born should do it; and if no firstborn is available, the kohen should wash his own hands. If the Levi is a scholar and the kohen an ignoramus, Magen Avraham records this as a dispute ... but others wrote explicitly that even so, the Levi must do the pouring.

The Gemara simply talks about a kohen washing hands. It's the Zohar that says a Levi should do it.

If no Levi is available, the job is given to a firstborn; if no firstborn is available, the kohen just washes his own hands.

I strongly suspect that if the Levi doesn't want to do it, just ignore him and go find a firstborn.

(Conflict-of-interest disclaimer -- I am a non-Levite firstborn, and don't get a lot of kohen-washing business!)

The Gemara simply talks about a kohen washing hands. It's the Zohar that says a Levi should do it.

If no Levi is available, the job is given to a firstborn; if no firstborn is available, the kohen just washes his own hands.

I strongly suspect that if the Levi doesn't want to do it, just ignore him and go find a firstborn.

(Conflict-of-interest disclaimer -- I am a non-Levite firstborn, and don't get a lot of kohen-washing business!)

Chayei Adam 32:8:

Ritually impure hands [disqualify]; how so? A Kohen who hasn't washed his hands is prohibited [from doing the blessings] ... and a Levi pours the water. If no Levi is available, a mother's-firstborn, naturally-born should do it; and if no firstborn is available, the kohen should wash his own hands. If the Levi is a scholar and the kohen an ignoramus, Magen Avraham records this as a dispute ... but others wrote explicitly that even so, the Levi must do the pouring.

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The Gemara simply talks about a kohen washing hands. It's the Zohar that says a Levi should do it.

If no Levi is available, the job is given to a firstborn; if no firstborn is available, the kohen just washes his own hands.

I strongly suspect that if the Levi doesn't want to do it, just ignore him and go find a firstborn.

(Conflict-of-interest disclaimer -- I am a non-Levite firstborn, and don't get a lot of kohen-washing business!)