2 update w/ additional info
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The March 20, 2013 issue of Mishpacha magazine contains the following anecdote in an interview of the singer Avrohom Fried, regarding the events preceding the production of his first album, "No Jew Will be Left Behind," in 1981:

[He] kept his plan quiet. But he wrote a letter to the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe explaining his idea, and the Rebbe wrote back wishing him hatzlachah -- and instructing him to print the words "Please do not play this recording on Shabbos and Jewish holidays" on the album.

"It seemed like a strange suggestion," muses the singer. "After all, how many people were there who were into chassidic music but not into Shabbos?"

It was a suggestion that could only have been made by someone who belived that no Jew will be left behind -- that even one transgression by one Yid is too much.

However, the practice seems to have begun even earlier, as the 1973 debut album of Mordechai Ben David contains the admonition, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath." Similarly, his 1974 album Hineni states, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath or Holidays." It's quite possible that this, too, originated with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, as MBD did have some connection with the Rebbe (if my impressions are correct). But this is just conjecture.

Update: I checked the jackets of the early albums of Cantor David Werdyger (MBD's father), and discovered that his 1959 record "T'filo L'Dovid" did not contain the phrase in question, but it did appear in his 1962 record "Songs of the Gerrer Chasidim." So the practice definitely predates Avrohom Fried by at least 19 years.

The March 20, 2013 issue of Mishpacha magazine contains the following anecdote in an interview of the singer Avrohom Fried, regarding the events preceding the production of his first album, "No Jew Will be Left Behind," in 1981:

[He] kept his plan quiet. But he wrote a letter to the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe explaining his idea, and the Rebbe wrote back wishing him hatzlachah -- and instructing him to print the words "Please do not play this recording on Shabbos and Jewish holidays" on the album.

"It seemed like a strange suggestion," muses the singer. "After all, how many people were there who were into chassidic music but not into Shabbos?"

It was a suggestion that could only have been made by someone who belived that no Jew will be left behind -- that even one transgression by one Yid is too much.

However, the practice seems to have begun even earlier, as the 1973 debut album of Mordechai Ben David contains the admonition, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath." Similarly, his 1974 album Hineni states, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath or Holidays." It's quite possible that this, too, originated with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, as MBD did have some connection with the Rebbe (if my impressions are correct). But this is just conjecture.

The March 20, 2013 issue of Mishpacha magazine contains the following anecdote in an interview of the singer Avrohom Fried, regarding the events preceding the production of his first album, "No Jew Will be Left Behind," in 1981:

[He] kept his plan quiet. But he wrote a letter to the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe explaining his idea, and the Rebbe wrote back wishing him hatzlachah -- and instructing him to print the words "Please do not play this recording on Shabbos and Jewish holidays" on the album.

"It seemed like a strange suggestion," muses the singer. "After all, how many people were there who were into chassidic music but not into Shabbos?"

It was a suggestion that could only have been made by someone who belived that no Jew will be left behind -- that even one transgression by one Yid is too much.

However, the practice seems to have begun even earlier, as the 1973 debut album of Mordechai Ben David contains the admonition, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath." Similarly, his 1974 album Hineni states, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath or Holidays." It's quite possible that this, too, originated with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, as MBD did have some connection with the Rebbe (if my impressions are correct). But this is just conjecture.

Update: I checked the jackets of the early albums of Cantor David Werdyger (MBD's father), and discovered that his 1959 record "T'filo L'Dovid" did not contain the phrase in question, but it did appear in his 1962 record "Songs of the Gerrer Chasidim." So the practice definitely predates Avrohom Fried by at least 19 years.

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source | link

The March 20, 2013 issue of Mishpacha magazine contains the following anecdote in an interview of the singer Avrohom Fried, regarding the events preceding the production of his first album, "No Jew Will be Left Behind," in 1981:

[He] kept his plan quiet. But he wrote a letter to the [Lubavitcher] Rebbe explaining his idea, and the Rebbe wrote back wishing him hatzlachah -- and instructing him to print the words "Please do not play this recording on Shabbos and Jewish holidays" on the album.

"It seemed like a strange suggestion," muses the singer. "After all, how many people were there who were into chassidic music but not into Shabbos?"

It was a suggestion that could only have been made by someone who belived that no Jew will be left behind -- that even one transgression by one Yid is too much.

However, the practice seems to have begun even earlier, as the 1973 debut album of Mordechai Ben David contains the admonition, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath." Similarly, his 1974 album Hineni states, "Please do not play this record on the Sabbath or Holidays." It's quite possible that this, too, originated with the Lubavitcher Rebbe, as MBD did have some connection with the Rebbe (if my impressions are correct). But this is just conjecture.