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The only place angels are mentioned by name in Tanakh is in Daniel (chs 8-10). In the Yerushalmi, we find a statement of Resh Laqish that the names of the angels we brought back from the Babylonian exile, and were unknown in pre-exilic Israel (Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2). The later one moves, the more names of angels there are, beginning with a few more in the writings from Qumran, then more in the Bavli, then many more in Kabbalistic literature.

The only place angels are mentioned by name in Tanakh is in Daniel (chs 8-10). In the Yerushalmi, we find a statement of Resh Laqish that the names of the angels we brought back from the Babylonian exile, and were unknown in pre-exilic Israel (Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2). The later one moves, the more names of angels there are, beginning with a few more in the writings from Qumran, then more in the Bavli, then many more in Kabbalistic literature.

The only place angels are mentioned by name in Tanakh is in Daniel (chs 8-10). In the Yerushalmi, we find a statement of Resh Laqish that the names of the angels we brought back from the Babylonian exile, and were unknown in pre-exilic Israel (Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2). The later one moves, the more names of angels there are, beginning with a few more in the writings from Qumran, then more in the Bavli, then many more in Kabbalistic literature.

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The only place angels are mentioned by name in Tanakh is in Daniel (chs 8-10). In the Yerushalmi, we find a statement of Resh Laqish that the names of the angels we brought back from the Babylonian exile, and were unknown in pre-exilic Israel (Yerushalmi Rosh haShana 1:2). The later one moves, the more names of angels there are, beginning with a few more in the writings from Qumran, then more in the Bavli, then many more in Kabbalistic literature.