2 Canadian influence, ha!
source | link

Turkey is not indigenous to the old world, so it only became possible to fulfill this forward-looking directive in recent centuries. While most still use chicken for kapparot, I am told (by Americans) that it is more proper to use a turkey now that we are able. Because This is especially common in Minhag Canada, where the secular turkey-eating holiday occasionally coincides with Yom Kippur (most recently 1989).

Because "hodu" also means "India", it is particularly praise-worthy to offer it with curry.

Turkey is not indigenous to the old world, so it only became possible to fulfill this forward-looking directive in recent centuries. While most still use chicken for kapparot, I am told (by Americans) that it is more proper to use a turkey now that we are able. Because "hodu" also means "India", it is particularly praise-worthy to offer it with curry.

Turkey is not indigenous to the old world, so it only became possible to fulfill this forward-looking directive in recent centuries. While most still use chicken for kapparot, I am told (by Americans) that it is more proper to use a turkey now that we are able. This is especially common in Minhag Canada, where the secular turkey-eating holiday occasionally coincides with Yom Kippur (most recently 1989).

Because "hodu" also means "India", it is particularly praise-worthy to offer it with curry.

1
source | link

Turkey is not indigenous to the old world, so it only became possible to fulfill this forward-looking directive in recent centuries. While most still use chicken for kapparot, I am told (by Americans) that it is more proper to use a turkey now that we are able. Because "hodu" also means "India", it is particularly praise-worthy to offer it with curry.