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In a later responsum to -- I believe R' Getzel Ellinson if I'm not mistaken -- Rabbi Moshe Feinstein clarifies:

"On the one hand, I write that generally a wife should adopt her husband's practices. On the other hand I also wrote that what sort of hair covering she should use is her decision his view in -- i.e. if she feels a sheitel is inadequate and would rather use a hatIgros Moshe EH4:32, he can't demand a sheitel; if she feels a sheitel is adequatesections 6 & 10, he can't prohibit it. [Note Rabbi Feinstein wasn't addressing a conflict of whether to cover at all; though there are anecdotes regarding Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik's opinion in such instances]. Yet on the other hand I also wrote that if she wants to shave her head, that is the husband's business and he can object. You ask me to resolve the contradiction between these positions, I really don't see one."Elyakim [Getsel] Ellinson:

  • Nowadays a man can't divorce his wife because she refuses to cover her hair (at all.)

  • Generally a wife should adopt her husband's practices; however, what sort of hair covering she should use is her decision -- i.e. if she feels a sheitel is inadequate and would rather use a hat, he can't demand a sheitel; if she feels a sheitel is adequate, he can't prohibit it -- this is just totally private to her. However he may object if she wants to shave her head. Rabbi Ellinson saw these three stances as contradictory, to which Rabbi Feinstein politely replies he has no clue what Rabbi Ellinson means.

In a later responsum to -- I believe R' Getzel Ellinson if I'm not mistaken -- Rabbi Moshe Feinstein clarifies:

"On the one hand, I write that generally a wife should adopt her husband's practices. On the other hand I also wrote that what sort of hair covering she should use is her decision -- i.e. if she feels a sheitel is inadequate and would rather use a hat, he can't demand a sheitel; if she feels a sheitel is adequate, he can't prohibit it. [Note Rabbi Feinstein wasn't addressing a conflict of whether to cover at all; though there are anecdotes regarding Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik's opinion in such instances]. Yet on the other hand I also wrote that if she wants to shave her head, that is the husband's business and he can object. You ask me to resolve the contradiction between these positions, I really don't see one."

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein clarifies his view in Igros Moshe EH4:32, sections 6 & 10, addressing Rabbi Elyakim [Getsel] Ellinson:

  • Nowadays a man can't divorce his wife because she refuses to cover her hair (at all.)

  • Generally a wife should adopt her husband's practices; however, what sort of hair covering she should use is her decision -- i.e. if she feels a sheitel is inadequate and would rather use a hat, he can't demand a sheitel; if she feels a sheitel is adequate, he can't prohibit it -- this is just totally private to her. However he may object if she wants to shave her head. Rabbi Ellinson saw these three stances as contradictory, to which Rabbi Feinstein politely replies he has no clue what Rabbi Ellinson means.

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In a later responsum to -- I believe R' Getzel Ellinson if I'm not mistaken -- Rabbi Moshe Feinstein clarifies:

"On the one hand, I write that generally a wife should adopt her husband's practices. On the other hand I also wrote that what sort of hair covering she should use is her decision -- i.e. if she feels a sheitel is inadequate and would rather use a hat, he can't demand a sheitel; if she feels a sheitel is adequate, he can't prohibit it. [Note Rabbi Feinstein wasn't addressing a conflict of whether to cover at all; though there are anecdotes regarding Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik's opinion in such instances]. Yet on the other hand I also wrote that if she wants to shave her head, that is the husband's business and he can object. You ask me to resolve the contradiction between these positions, I really don't see one."