2 http://chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/6037580#6037580 et seq.
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While there are great Ashkenazim, and excellent Jews of all communities, thereInstitutionalized Judaism is a superiority complex among some Ashkenazim and they have a kindlargely composed of monopoly on institutionalized JudaismAshkenazim, which makes some Sepharadim feel like they need to fit in or dress 'acceptably' in order to be accepted. Sometimes, people need to play dress up in order to be taken seriously. That: that is the unfortunate state of a sizable portion of JudaismJewry these days. Its not nice, but it is the absolute truth. This answer is based on personal experience, in fact, things I encounter every day.

While there are great Ashkenazim, and excellent Jews of all communities, there is a superiority complex among some Ashkenazim and they have a kind of monopoly on institutionalized Judaism which makes some Sepharadim feel like they need to fit in or dress 'acceptably' in order to be accepted. Sometimes, people need to play dress up in order to be taken seriously. That is the unfortunate state of a sizable portion of Judaism these days. Its not nice, but it is the absolute truth. This answer is based on personal experience, in fact, things I encounter every day.

Institutionalized Judaism is largely composed of Ashkenazim, which makes some Sepharadim feel like they need to fit in or dress 'acceptably' in order to be accepted. Sometimes, people need to dress up in order to be taken seriously: that is the unfortunate state of a sizable portion of Jewry these days. This answer is based on personal experience, in fact, things I encounter every day.

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While there are great Ashkenazim, and excellent Jews of all communities, there is a superiority complex among some Ashkenazim and they have a kind of monopoly on institutionalized Judaism which makes some Sepharadim feel like they need to fit in or dress 'acceptably' in order to be accepted. Sometimes, people need to play dress up in order to be taken seriously. That is the unfortunate state of a sizable portion of Judaism these days. Its not nice, but it is the absolute truth. This answer is based on personal experience, in fact, things I encounter every day.