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The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he didn't even plant them, although it is wise to have him check with his local rabbi before doing so.

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he didn't even plant them, although it is wise to have him check with his local rabbi before doing so.

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he didn't even plant them, although it is wise to have him check with his local rabbi before doing so.

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The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he didn't even plant them, although it is wise to have him check with his local rabbi before doing so.