2 the man spent so much time on his model, we should at least spell his name correctly
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I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the GarradGarrard model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, substantial parts of whose walls still exist (the present-day Western Wall plaza fronts a small section of one of them), and which is a trapezoid, roughly 1500x1000 feet.] The original 500x500-cubit area had a higher level of sanctity, so it makes sense that it would have been surrounded by some kind of wall to mark it off.

In that picture, though, there is what looks like a low wall between that colonnade and the walls of the Temple courtyards proper. That is probably a depiction of the soreg (ibid. 2:3), which is indeed described as a low wall (10 handbreadths, about 3 feet, tall) made of crosshatched lathes, and which indeed was the point beyond which non-Jews were not allowed to enter.

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrad model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, substantial parts of whose walls still exist (the present-day Western Wall plaza fronts a small section of one of them), and which is a trapezoid, roughly 1500x1000 feet.] The original 500x500-cubit area had a higher level of sanctity, so it makes sense that it would have been surrounded by some kind of wall to mark it off.

In that picture, though, there is what looks like a low wall between that colonnade and the walls of the Temple courtyards proper. That is probably a depiction of the soreg (ibid. 2:3), which is indeed described as a low wall (10 handbreadths, about 3 feet, tall) made of crosshatched lathes, and which indeed was the point beyond which non-Jews were not allowed to enter.

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrard model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, substantial parts of whose walls still exist (the present-day Western Wall plaza fronts a small section of one of them), and which is a trapezoid, roughly 1500x1000 feet.] The original 500x500-cubit area had a higher level of sanctity, so it makes sense that it would have been surrounded by some kind of wall to mark it off.

In that picture, though, there is what looks like a low wall between that colonnade and the walls of the Temple courtyards proper. That is probably a depiction of the soreg (ibid. 2:3), which is indeed described as a low wall (10 handbreadths, about 3 feet, tall) made of crosshatched lathes, and which indeed was the point beyond which non-Jews were not allowed to enter.

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source | link

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrad model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, substantial parts of whose walls still exist (the present-day Western Wall plaza fronts a small section of one of them), and which is a trapezoid, roughly 1500x1000 feet.] The original 500x500-cubit area had a higher level of sanctity, so it makes sense that it would have been surrounded by some kind of wall to mark it off.

In that picture, though, there is what looks like a low wall between that colonnade and the walls of the Temple courtyards proper. That is probably a depiction of the soreg (ibid. 2:3), which is indeed described as a low wall (10 handbreadths, about 3 feet, tall) made of crosshatched lathes, and which indeed was the point beyond which non-Jews were not allowed to enter.