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Rav Henkin permitted davening in a shul without a mechitza under limited circumstances. He writeswrites:

"Every individual should live in a place of observant Jews if possible. However, if this is not possible, we should not be strict concerning these matters because it will lead to a potential catastrophe.

However, if the place itself is corrupt in that it has mixed-seating, it has already been established that it is preferable to pray by yourself at home. But, if this is the only synagogue in the area and you will always have to pray at home, you must examine the situation and evaluate the corruption versus the hope that through the involvement of the observant in this congregation, the community will become Orthodox. Yet, in all situations you must reprimand them if you pray in their midst."

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=22080&st=&pgnum=28

I'm not sure how this ruling would apply to the summer program you are participating in, since R. Henkin was talking about only mixed seating, but not necessarily mixed participation, but some of the factors to consider are mentioned in his response.

Rav Henkin permitted davening in a shul without a mechitza under limited circumstances. He writes:

"Every individual should live in a place of observant Jews if possible. However, if this is not possible, we should not be strict concerning these matters because it will lead to a potential catastrophe.

However, if the place itself is corrupt in that it has mixed-seating, it has already been established that it is preferable to pray by yourself at home. But, if this is the only synagogue in the area and you will always have to pray at home, you must examine the situation and evaluate the corruption versus the hope that through the involvement of the observant in this congregation, the community will become Orthodox. Yet, in all situations you must reprimand them if you pray in their midst."

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=22080&st=&pgnum=28

I'm not sure how this ruling would apply to the summer program you are participating in, since R. Henkin was talking about only mixed seating, but not necessarily mixed participation, but some of the factors to consider are mentioned in his response.

Rav Henkin permitted davening in a shul without a mechitza under limited circumstances. He writes:

"Every individual should live in a place of observant Jews if possible. However, if this is not possible, we should not be strict concerning these matters because it will lead to a potential catastrophe.

However, if the place itself is corrupt in that it has mixed-seating, it has already been established that it is preferable to pray by yourself at home. But, if this is the only synagogue in the area and you will always have to pray at home, you must examine the situation and evaluate the corruption versus the hope that through the involvement of the observant in this congregation, the community will become Orthodox. Yet, in all situations you must reprimand them if you pray in their midst."

I'm not sure how this ruling would apply to the summer program you are participating in, since R. Henkin was talking about only mixed seating, but not necessarily mixed participation, but some of the factors to consider are mentioned in his response.

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source | link

Rav Henkin permitted davening in a shul without a mechitza under limited circumstances. He writes:

"Every individual should live in a place of observant Jews if possible. However, if this is not possible, we should not be strict concerning these matters because it will lead to a potential catastrophe.

However, if the place itself is corrupt in that it has mixed-seating, it has already been established that it is preferable to pray by yourself at home. But, if this is the only synagogue in the area and you will always have to pray at home, you must examine the situation and evaluate the corruption versus the hope that through the involvement of the observant in this congregation, the community will become Orthodox. Yet, in all situations you must reprimand them if you pray in their midst."

http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=22080&st=&pgnum=28

I'm not sure how this ruling would apply to the summer program you are participating in, since R. Henkin was talking about only mixed seating, but not necessarily mixed participation, but some of the factors to consider are mentioned in his response.