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The Targum on MishleiThe Targum on Mishlei 2:4 translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, yaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between bakashah and chipus; he writes that the former implies desire while the latter implies action.

The Targum on Mishlei translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, yaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between bakashah and chipus; he writes that the former implies desire while the latter implies action.

The Targum on Mishlei 2:4 translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, yaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between bakashah and chipus; he writes that the former implies desire while the latter implies action.

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The Targum on Mishlei translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, while "yaga'ti" refersyaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between bakashah and chipus; he writes that the former implies desire while the latter implies action.

The analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven, while "yaga'ti" refers to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

The Targum on Mishlei translates תחפשנה as sitzb'yah - desire, suggesting that the analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven. By contrast, yaga'ti seems to by definition refer to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.

Note, however, that the Malbim (Mishlei, 2:4) distinguishes between bakashah and chipus; he writes that the former implies desire while the latter implies action.

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The analogy in Mishlei emphasizes that you should be highly motivated and driven, while "yaga'ti" refers to the actual work that someone retrospectively put in to acquire Torah.