3 gave link to gemara, in response to comment
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According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19 And that is what Resh Lakish meant when he said: What is the meaning of the verse, 'This is the book of the generations of Adam?20 It is to intimate that the Holy One, blessed be He, showed him [Adam] every generation and its thinkers,21 every generation and its sages. When he came to the generation of Rabbi Akiba, he [Adam] rejoiced at his learning but was grieved at his death,22 and said: How weighty23 are Thy friends24 to me, O God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

(To explain this gemara, there is a statement in Tehillim 139:17:

וְלִי--מַה-יָּקְרוּ רֵעֶיךָ אֵל; מֶה עָצְמוּ, רָאשֵׁיהֶם. How weighty also are Thy thoughts unto me, O God! How great is the sum of them!

and the midrash puts this spin on that statement, that Adam Harishon said it in this context. The statement contains Aramaisms.

According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19 And that is what Resh Lakish meant when he said: What is the meaning of the verse, 'This is the book of the generations of Adam?20 It is to intimate that the Holy One, blessed be He, showed him [Adam] every generation and its thinkers,21 every generation and its sages. When he came to the generation of Rabbi Akiba, he [Adam] rejoiced at his learning but was grieved at his death,22 and said: How weighty23 are Thy friends24 to me, O God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

(To explain this gemara, there is a statement in Tehillim 139:17:

וְלִי--מַה-יָּקְרוּ רֵעֶיךָ אֵל; מֶה עָצְמוּ, רָאשֵׁיהֶם. How weighty also are Thy thoughts unto me, O God! How great is the sum of them!

and the midrash puts this spin on that statement, that Adam Harishon said it in this context. The statement contains Aramaisms.

2 gave link to gemara, in response to comment
source | link

According to Sanhedrin 38aSanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.

1
source | link

According to Sanhedrin 38a:

Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19

which perhaps would make Aramaic the mother of all languages spoken today in the world.