3 observers usually means those who observe others doing something
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The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus (observers ofthose who follow the laws of keeping kosher) consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus (observers of the laws of keeping kosher) consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus (those who follow the laws of keeping kosher) consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

2 translated
source | link

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus (observers of the laws of keeping kosher) consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus (observers of the laws of keeping kosher) consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.

1
source | link

The answers here address the controversy surrounding gelatin. However, the question was: who determines the kosher status of "new" foods?

While the vast majority of shomrei kashrus consume turkey meat today, the kashrus status of this New World bird was a major debate.

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/turkey/

Less controversial is the North American Bison. All agree that this animal (sometimes referred to as the buffalo) has the simanim of a kosher mammal. The question is, is it a behemah or a chayah? Must we do ksiui hadam? Is the back fat considered cheilev (and therefore forbidden to eat)?

I remember hearing that, in practice, kosher bison producers are machmir both ways - they do kisui hadam, as if it were a chayah (but without a bracha), but they do not eat the back fat (which would be classified as cheilev, if it were a behemah).

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/buffalo/

The most perplexing issues arise from New World starchy vegetables. For Ashkenazim, the question becomes, which of these vegetables should be considered kitnyios on Pesach, and which should not?

Corn (maize) became kitnyios because of a linguistic error. "Corn" in old English (and other European languages) means any type of grain. European explorers found this strange yellow cobs growing, and called the stuff "Indian corn" (i.e. Indian grain). When people asked their Ashkenazi rabbis if they could eat "Indian corn" on Pesach - the answer was "of course not! We don't eat any kind of corn on Pesach!"

So the New World maize became forbidden, but the New World potato survived the same challenge.

A more recent kitynios controversy surrounds quinoa.

http://www.oukosher.org/index.php/learn/article/quinoa/

So to answer the question - why do some newly discovered foods eventually become commonplace (turkey), and others don't?

Ultimately, it comes down to community standards. Different qualified poskim will render different decisions on new foods. Then, the marketplace ultimately rules.

That is why one finds many fewer "kosher for those who eat gelatin" products in Israel today, than a few decades ago. It's not worth the kosher candy store's effort to buy two different types of gummy worms. (one with treif-based gelatin, one with kosher fish or plant-based gelatin).

In some Jewish communities, people serve quinoa salad on Pesach without a second thought. In other communities, you couldn't have any yom tov company eat at your house if you served quinoa.

To summarize, a combination of the plurality of halachic rulings, and the free market in Jewish communities, determine which new foods are acceptable, and which are not.