5 added 315 characters in body
source | link

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.

While he doesn't say it explicitly, it appears the Siftei Chachamim is basing his explanation on Rashi Shemot 8:22, who brings both translations of the word "To'evah".


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).  The Egyptians ate sheep, except the firstborn sheep, which they worshiped.

[Based on this, I would say that Egyptians wouldn't eat the meat of non-Egyptians, since it was possible the firstborn sheep were mixed into the meat. Only Egyptians made sure that the meat they ate did not come from any firstborn sheep]

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.

While he doesn't say it explicitly, it appears the Siftei Chachamim is basing his explanation on Rashi Shemot 8:22, who brings both translations of the word "To'evah".


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).  

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.

While he doesn't say it explicitly, it appears the Siftei Chachamim is basing his explanation on Rashi Shemot 8:22, who brings both translations of the word "To'evah".


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians). The Egyptians ate sheep, except the firstborn sheep, which they worshiped.

[Based on this, I would say that Egyptians wouldn't eat the meat of non-Egyptians, since it was possible the firstborn sheep were mixed into the meat. Only Egyptians made sure that the meat they ate did not come from any firstborn sheep]

4 added info about rashi 8:22
source | link

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.

While he doesn't say it explicitly, it appears the Siftei Chachamim is basing his explanation on Rashi Shemot 8:22, who brings both translations of the word "To'evah".


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.

While he doesn't say it explicitly, it appears the Siftei Chachamim is basing his explanation on Rashi Shemot 8:22, who brings both translations of the word "To'evah".


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

3 added a link to the Kehot Chumash
source | link

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated TranslationKehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

Rashi (46:34):

כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות:

are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods.

The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly honored shepherds, and in their eyes the shepherds were indistinguishable from the "gods" they took care of (and the Torah is using the term To'evah (abomination) to refer to the way the Egyptians treated the shepherds, as if they themselves were gods - since the Torah refers to idol worship as an abomination). Therefore they would settle the family in Goshen, which is the best of the land.


The Kehot Chumash Interpolated Translation, based on a footnote of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutei Sichot Vol. 5, pg. 266, note 23) says as follows:

for all non-Egyptian shepherds are abhorrent to the Egyptians, for they raise sheep for food, and the Egyptians worship firstborn sheep.

In the footnote, the Rebbe explains as follows. From Shemot 11:5 we see that the Egyptians only worshiped the first born animal. (Even though it says "animal" and not "sheep", the Rebbe points out Bereshit 4:20, where Rashi explicitly interchanges "sheep" and "animals").

Rashi (Bereshit 43:32), tells us that Onlekos gives a reason why the Egyptians wouldn't eat with the brothers:

because it is an abomination to the Egyptians: It is a hateful thing for the Egyptians to eat with the Hebrews, and Onkelos gave the reason for the matter.

Onkelos says:

אֲרֵי בְּעִירָא דְּמִצְרָאֵי דָּחֲלִין לֵיהּ עִבְרָאֵי אָכְלִין.

Because the Hebrews ate the sheep that the Egyptians worshiped.

So the Rebbe concludes that the Egyptians problem was with non-Egyptian shepherds, who ate all sheep (including the firstborns, which were worshiped by the Egyptians).

2 tried to bring my summation more in line with the siftei chachamim
source | link
1
source | link