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This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. According to the Bar Ilan Responsa Database, there are only 3 places3 places where Yael and Yehudit appear in the same article. R. Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev mentions the actions of these two heroic women, and comments that they are similar. Rabbi Jacob Ettlinger (Aruch LaNer) mentions them together in passing, as does the Encyclopedia Talmudit.

This story is was translated into Hebrew and published in 1915 in the "Otzar haMidrashim" collection. It does not mention Ya'el either. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named Ya'el.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. According to the Bar Ilan Responsa Database, there are only 3 places where Yael and Yehudit appear in the same article. R. Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev mentions the actions of these two heroic women, and comments that they are similar. Rabbi Jacob Ettlinger (Aruch LaNer) mentions them together in passing, as does the Encyclopedia Talmudit.

This story is was translated into Hebrew and published in 1915 in the "Otzar haMidrashim" collection. It does not mention Ya'el either. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named Ya'el.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. According to the Bar Ilan Responsa Database, there are only 3 places where Yael and Yehudit appear in the same article. R. Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev mentions the actions of these two heroic women, and comments that they are similar. Rabbi Jacob Ettlinger (Aruch LaNer) mentions them together in passing, as does the Encyclopedia Talmudit.

This story is was translated into Hebrew and published in 1915 in the "Otzar haMidrashim" collection. It does not mention Ya'el either. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named Ya'el.

4 added more sources
source | link

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. According to the Bar Ilan Responsa Database, there are only 3 places where Yael and Yehudit appear in the same article. R. Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev mentions the actions of these two heroic women, and comments that they are similar. Rabbi Jacob Ettlinger (Aruch LaNer) mentions them together in passing, as does the Encyclopedia Talmudit.

This story is was translated into Hebrew and published in 1915 in the "Otzar haMidrashim" collection. It does not mention Ya'el either. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named, or even just acted in the spirit of, Ya'el.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named, or even just acted in the spirit of, Ya'el.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. According to the Bar Ilan Responsa Database, there are only 3 places where Yael and Yehudit appear in the same article. R. Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev mentions the actions of these two heroic women, and comments that they are similar. Rabbi Jacob Ettlinger (Aruch LaNer) mentions them together in passing, as does the Encyclopedia Talmudit.

This story is was translated into Hebrew and published in 1915 in the "Otzar haMidrashim" collection. It does not mention Ya'el either. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named Ya'el.

3 added 87 characters in body
source | link

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named, or even just acted in the spirit of, Ya'el.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is.

This primary source for this story is actually it's own book, The Book of Judith (English Translation, Chabad Summary).

Chapter 13: So Judith was left alone in the tent , with Holofernes stretched out on his bed, for he was overcome with wine... She went up to the post at the end of the bed, above Holofernes' head, and took down his sword that hung there. She came close to his bed and took hold of the hair of his head, and said, "Give me strength this day, O Lord God of Israel!" And she struck his neck twice with all her might, and severed it from his body.

The text of the book does not mention Ya'el, despite the obvious similarities. I don't know what the Chabad article's source is for claiming that Yehudit explicitly named, or even just acted in the spirit of, Ya'el.

2 added 135 characters in body
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