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The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambam's words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits (and would therefore make him a tzadik).

Second, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has a majority of merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all (this is the "tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant (this is the "tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, only certain souls have the ability to become a tzaddik, so not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambam's words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits (and would therefore make him a tzadik.

Second, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has a majority of merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all (this is the "tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant (this is the "tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, only certain souls have the ability to become a tzaddik, so not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambam's words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits (and would therefore make him a tzadik).

Second, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has a majority of merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all (this is the "tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant (this is the "tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, only certain souls have the ability to become a tzaddik, so not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

13 Hopefully clarified.
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The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the RambamsRambam's words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits (and would therefore make him a tzadik.

In additionSecond, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sinsingle sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has morea majority of merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all ("tzaddikthis is the "tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant ("tzaddikthis is the "tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, a person must be born with a soul that hasonly certain souls have the ability to become a tzaddik, andso not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven., someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambams words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits.

In addition, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has more merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all ("tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant ("tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, a person must be born with a soul that has the ability to become a tzaddik, and not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambam's words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits (and would therefore make him a tzadik.

Second, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has a majority of merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all (this is the "tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant (this is the "tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, only certain souls have the ability to become a tzaddik, so not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

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The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambams words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits.

In addition, it contradictsthey contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has more merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all ("tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant ("tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, a person must be born with a soul that has the ability to become a tzaddik, and not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambams words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits.

In addition, it contradicts the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has more merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all ("tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant ("tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, a person must be born with a soul that has the ability to become a tzaddik, and not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

The Alter Rebbe of Lubavitch, Rabbi Shneur Zalman, explains in the beginning of Tanya that if you take the Rambams words (which are also Rashi and Tosfos' words) at face value, they create several contradictions.

First, they contradict Rabba, who called himself a beinoni despite the fact that he never stopped learning, to the extent that the Angel of Death had trouble killing him. If the requirement to be a tzaddik was merely a majority of merits, then Rabba calling himself a beinoni would be blatantly false, since his sins (if any) were certainly less than his merits.

In addition, they contradict the words of the gemara in Yevamos 20a and in Niddah 12a, namely, that one who commits a single sin, (specifically, even a d'rabanan) is called a Rasha.

Therefore, the Baal HaTanya explains that when we say a tzaddik is someone who has more merits, it is a "shem hamushal" - a "borrowed name" - from the concept of reward and punishment, because a person is judged (in Beis Din shel Maalah) after the majority of his deeds, and is pronounced a "tzaddik" when his merits exceed his failings.

However, a "real tzaddik" is someone who either has no yetzer hara (evil inclination) at all ("tzaddik v'tov lo", or "tzaddik gomur"), or whose yetzer hara is so subjugated to the will of his yetzer tov (good inclination) that it never even "voices its opinion", and is completely dormant ("tzaddik v'ra lo", or "tzaddik she'aino gomur").

According to the Tanya, a person must be born with a soul that has the ability to become a tzaddik, and not every soul can. However, someone who works on themselves and rises to the level of a "beinoni" can be granted a "tzaddik soul" by heaven.

This is part of a very long hemshech in Tanya which deserves more attention than I've been able to give it here. At the very least, the first chapter should be read, to see this in context. Excellent translation and explanation below.

Source: First two or three chapters of Tanya.

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8 added a link to lessons in tanya chapter 1
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3 I assume you must mean "'borrowed' the term 'tzaddik' to the concept of reward and punishment". Otherwise, please undo this edit!
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