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According to views of some authorities (Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), learning without pronouncing words or listening to Torah recordings does not qualify as the mitzvah of TalmidTalmud Torah. Consequently, it seems that one is able to learn Torah quietly or via recordings without fulfilling the mitzvah of TalmidTalmud Torah.

According to these views, would such learning qualify as a mitzvah? If not, is time spent learning quietly considered bittul Torah according to these views?

According to views of some authorities (Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), learning without pronouncing words or listening to Torah recordings does not qualify as the mitzvah of Talmid Torah. Consequently, it seems that one is able to learn Torah quietly or via recordings without fulfilling the mitzvah of Talmid Torah.

According to these views, would such learning qualify as a mitzvah? If not, is time spent learning quietly considered bittul Torah according to these views?

According to views of some authorities (Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), learning without pronouncing words or listening to Torah recordings does not qualify as the mitzvah of Talmud Torah. Consequently, it seems that one is able to learn Torah quietly or via recordings without fulfilling the mitzvah of Talmud Torah.

According to these views, would such learning qualify as a mitzvah? If not, is time spent learning quietly considered bittul Torah according to these views?

2 added 43 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
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Does one fulfill anythe mitzvah by thinking or listening toof knowing Torah recordingsexist as separate from mitzvah of learning Torah?

According to authorities who require actual pronunciation of words aloud in order to fulfill the mitzvahviews of Talmid Torahsome authorities (such as ShulchanShulchan Aruch HaRav and others), does thinking Torah thoughtslearning without pronouncing words or listening to Torah recordings does not qualify as the mitzvah of aTalmid Torah class fulfill any other mitzvah, such as Yedias haTorah?

If yes. Consequently, canit seems that one performis able to learn Torah quietly or via recordings without fulfilling the mitzvah of yedias haTorah without actually doing Talmid Torah.

According to these views, would such learning qualify as a mitzvah? If not, is time spent learning quietly considered bittul Torah according to these views?

Does one fulfill any mitzvah by thinking or listening to Torah recordings?

According to authorities who require actual pronunciation of words aloud in order to fulfill the mitzvah of Talmid Torah (such as Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), does thinking Torah thoughts or listening to recordings of a Torah class fulfill any other mitzvah, such as Yedias haTorah?

If yes, can one perform the mitzvah of yedias haTorah without actually doing Talmid Torah?

Does the mitzvah of knowing Torah exist as separate from mitzvah of learning Torah?

According to views of some authorities (Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), learning without pronouncing words or listening to Torah recordings does not qualify as the mitzvah of Talmid Torah. Consequently, it seems that one is able to learn Torah quietly or via recordings without fulfilling the mitzvah of Talmid Torah.

According to these views, would such learning qualify as a mitzvah? If not, is time spent learning quietly considered bittul Torah according to these views?

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Does one fulfill any mitzvah by thinking or listening to Torah recordings?

According to authorities who require actual pronunciation of words aloud in order to fulfill the mitzvah of Talmid Torah (such as Shulchan Aruch HaRav and others), does thinking Torah thoughts or listening to recordings of a Torah class fulfill any other mitzvah, such as Yedias haTorah?

If yes, can one perform the mitzvah of yedias haTorah without actually doing Talmid Torah?