4 fix link to the right page
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I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In theThe Kaufmann A50Kaufmann A50, a Western manuscript with the most highly-respected readings of any, has a patach all three times (middle of the right column).

In MS Parma A, a highly-respected Eastern manuscript (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

The usage of patach here seems to be pretty old, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In the Kaufmann A50, a Western manuscript with the most highly-respected readings of any, has a patach all three times (middle of the right column).

In MS Parma A, a highly-respected Eastern manuscript (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

The usage of patach here seems to be pretty old, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

The Kaufmann A50, a Western manuscript with the most highly-respected readings of any, has a patach all three times (middle of the right column).

In MS Parma A, a highly-respected Eastern manuscript (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

The usage of patach here seems to be pretty old, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

3 added 124 characters in body
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I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In the thisKaufmann A50, a Western manuscript with the most highly-respected readings of any, has a patach all three times (middle of the right column), it's a patach all three times.

In thisMS Parma A one, a highly-respected Eastern manuscript (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

ItThe usage of patach here seems like ato be pretty old change, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In this manuscript (middle of the right column), it's a patach all three times.

In this one (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

It seems like a pretty old change, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In the Kaufmann A50, a Western manuscript with the most highly-respected readings of any, has a patach all three times (middle of the right column).

In MS Parma A, a highly-respected Eastern manuscript (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

The usage of patach here seems to be pretty old, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

2 added 26 characters in body; added 5 characters in body
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I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In this manuscript (middle of the right column), it's a patach all three times.

In this one (bottom of the left column), the secondlast two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

It seems like a pretty old change, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In this manuscript (middle of the right column), it's a patach all three times.

In this one, the second two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

It seems like a pretty old change, maybe when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

I just took a look at some mishnah manuscripts from Argon's links in this answer. The word appears three times in Kesubos 7:6. The language there is very similar to the language used during kiddushin and may even be the source, although דת משה ויהודית/ישראל in the two cases are not referring to exactly the same laws.

In this manuscript (middle of the right column), it's a patach all three times.

In this one (bottom of the left column), the last two are definitely written with a patach. For the first one it's hard to tell, could be either one.

It seems like a pretty old change, maybe from when the Persian word got adapted into more regular Hebrew use.

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