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I'm asking this question as a follow up to my other question - Honoring a parent vs. Shalom Bayit - which has priority?

The main answer given in that question indicates that honoring one's parents generally has extremely high priority. However, when that conflicts with the observance of a Torah law, then, one should not listen to the parents.

With these conditions in mind, I'd like to follow up with a practical question.

Someone hasElder care is a large family with many young kids who needhuge concern for the father to assist at home with family chores esp"sandwich" generation. homeworkFamilies have to make difficult decisions between their own family's "health" and monitoring school progresstheir parents. One of the childrenThe problem is learning disabled and needs extra attention on multiple levels - social interactions,compounded when parents live some distance away.

In viewing the father being a role model, handlinganswer in the child's education needslinked question, etcthere seems to be "equal weight" Torah commandments between educating your children and honoring your parents.

The father'sSo, assume that someone's parents live in a far-away city. They insistrequests that that the fatherchild live with them "permanently" (let's say, heso that s/he can return homecare for a weekend once per month) and tend to their needs, personally, as they want to live in their own homethem, and assume that they don'tdo not want an aide living with them.

If the father moves in with his parents, he will not be ableor others to help with his children's education - also a Torah commandment and the father's obligationdo this job.

We have With these two perhaps, "conflicting""equal" Torah obligationscommandments in mind, here. Should the father stay home and use the reasoning that he is not required to listen tocan a child absolve himself of honoring his parents if they request him to not observe a Torah commandmentcompletely (to teachi.e. living with his children Torahparents, specifically)? Do these or any of the other parametersCan (caring for/ should s/he find an aide or place them in a special needs child,nursing home so that someone else can care for example)them, and override the obligation to honorhis parent's objections? And, can s/he absolve him/herself of other solutions if the parents in this situationinsist on no other solution other than his living with them?

I'm asking this question as a follow up to my other question - Honoring a parent vs. Shalom Bayit - which has priority?

The main answer given in that question indicates that honoring one's parents generally has extremely high priority. However, when that conflicts with the observance of a Torah law, then, one should not listen to the parents.

With these conditions in mind, I'd like to follow up with a practical question.

Someone has a large family with many young kids who need the father to assist at home with family chores esp. homework and monitoring school progress. One of the children is learning disabled and needs extra attention on multiple levels - social interactions, the father being a role model, handling the child's education needs, etc.

The father's parents live in a far-away city. They insist that the father live with them "permanently" (let's say, he can return home for a weekend once per month) and tend to their needs, personally, as they want to live in their own home, and they don't want an aide living with them.

If the father moves in with his parents, he will not be able to help with his children's education - also a Torah commandment and the father's obligation.

We have two perhaps, "conflicting" Torah obligations, here. Should the father stay home and use the reasoning that he is not required to listen to his parents if they request him to not observe a Torah commandment (to teach his children Torah)? Do these or any of the other parameters (caring for a special needs child, for example) override the obligation to honor the parents in this situation?

I'm asking this question as a follow up to my other question - Honoring a parent vs. Shalom Bayit - which has priority?

The main answer given in that question indicates that honoring one's parents generally has extremely high priority. However, when that conflicts with the observance of a Torah law, then, one should not listen to the parents.

With these conditions in mind, I'd like to follow up with a practical question.

Elder care is a huge concern for the "sandwich" generation. Families have to make difficult decisions between their own family's "health" and their parents. The problem is compounded when parents live some distance away.

In viewing the answer in the linked question, there seems to be "equal weight" Torah commandments between educating your children and honoring your parents.

So, assume that someone's parents requests that that the child live with them so that s/he can care for them, and assume that they do not want an aide or others to do this job. With these two "equal" Torah commandments in mind, can a child absolve himself of honoring his parents request completely (i.e. living with his parents, specifically)? Can / should s/he find an aide or place them in a nursing home so that someone else can care for them, and override his parent's objections? And, can s/he absolve him/herself of other solutions if the parents insist on no other solution other than his living with them?

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Elder care, Shalom Bayit and Honoring parents - which has priority?

I'm asking this question as a follow up to my other question - Honoring a parent vs. Shalom Bayit - which has priority?

The main answer given in that question indicates that honoring one's parents generally has extremely high priority. However, when that conflicts with the observance of a Torah law, then, one should not listen to the parents.

With these conditions in mind, I'd like to follow up with a practical question.

Someone has a large family with many young kids who need the father to assist at home with family chores esp. homework and monitoring school progress. One of the children is learning disabled and needs extra attention on multiple levels - social interactions, the father being a role model, handling the child's education needs, etc.

The father's parents live in a far-away city. They insist that the father live with them "permanently" (let's say, he can return home for a weekend once per month) and tend to their needs, personally, as they want to live in their own home, and they don't want an aide living with them.

If the father moves in with his parents, he will not be able to help with his children's education - also a Torah commandment and the father's obligation.

We have two perhaps, "conflicting" Torah obligations, here. Should the father stay home and use the reasoning that he is not required to listen to his parents if they request him to not observe a Torah commandment (to teach his children Torah)? Do these or any of the other parameters (caring for a special needs child, for example) override the obligation to honor the parents in this situation?