3 Quoted R' Gil STUDENT
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Something to consider here is - which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Melamed suggests that sending a text message on Shabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhereRabbi Gil Student writes concerning text messages on shabbos:

When you send a text or e-mail, you are causing it to be saved not only on your phone or computer (usually) but also on intermediary servers. The text or e-mail is permanently stored electronically and will always be available for retrieval (e.g. by the police). It seems that this falls under a safek de-oraisa, a question of a biblical prohibition.

(I'd thought it was "writing"; fascinatingly, he quotes R. Auerbach that it may be "building.")

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

Something to consider here is - which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Melamed suggests that sending a text message on Shabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhere.

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

Something to consider here is - which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Student writes concerning text messages on shabbos:

When you send a text or e-mail, you are causing it to be saved not only on your phone or computer (usually) but also on intermediary servers. The text or e-mail is permanently stored electronically and will always be available for retrieval (e.g. by the police). It seems that this falls under a safek de-oraisa, a question of a biblical prohibition.

(I'd thought it was "writing"; fascinatingly, he quotes R. Auerbach that it may be "building.")

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

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Something to consider here is -- which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil StudentMelamed suggests that sending a text message on shabbos mayShabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhere.

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

Something to consider here is -- which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Student suggests that sending a text message on shabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhere.

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

Something to consider here is - which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Melamed suggests that sending a text message on Shabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhere.

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)

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Something to consider here is -- which of these methods leave more of a permanent record? Rabbi Gil Student suggests that sending a text message on shabbos may constitute "writing" because it's all stored somewhere.

By that logic, the good-old-fashioned taxi doesn't have your direct actions leaving a permanent record the way an app would. (Something else to consider, though -- an app tends not to care why you're going to the hospital. I've heard some taxi dispatchers don't want to pick up a woman in labor!)

I asked Rabbi Mordechai Willig shlit'a whether it's better to pay a taxi driver by credit card or cash, and he said definitely cash, it's faster. (He didn't get into the halachos behind it, but one could argue that handing over a fifty-dollar bill is known to be exactly two rabbinic prohibitions -- muktzeh, and business transactions. Whereas the permanent record of a credit card could be biblical.)