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ManyFirst, many Rambam's opponents question the very idea of the 13 principles being the "true" principles of Judaism (and the practical application for deciding who's called a heretic, for example).

Second, In my understanding, based on R' Margaliot's book, in those principles, Rambam is trying to "build" reasonable and consistent proof of the Torah's validity as opposed to other religions.

As #6 (prophecy) is not exclusive to the Jewish people, other nations may claim that their prophets receive other messages or texts. A firm belief that Moses was different from them all will, therefore, prove the superiority of our Torah to their texts.

Many question the very idea of the 13 principles being the "true" principles of Judaism (and the practical application for deciding who's called a heretic, for example).

In my understanding, based on R' Margaliot's book, in those principles, Rambam is trying to "build" reasonable and consistent proof of the Torah's validity as opposed to other religions.

As #6 (prophecy) is not exclusive to the Jewish people, other nations may claim that their prophets receive other messages or texts. A firm belief that Moses was different from them all will, therefore, prove the superiority of our Torah to their texts.

First, many Rambam's opponents question the idea of the 13 principles being the "true" principles of Judaism (and the practical application for deciding who's called a heretic, for example).

Second, In my understanding, based on R' Margaliot's book, in those principles, Rambam is trying to "build" reasonable and consistent proof of the Torah's validity as opposed to other religions.

As #6 (prophecy) is not exclusive to the Jewish people, other nations may claim that their prophets receive other messages or texts. A firm belief that Moses was different from them all will, therefore, prove the superiority of our Torah to their texts.

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source | link

Many question the very idea of the 13 principles being the "true" principles of Judaism (and the practical application for deciding who's called a heretic, for example).

In my understanding, based on R' Margaliot's book, in those principles, Rambam is trying to "build" reasonable and consistent proof of the Torah's validity as opposed to other religions.

As #6 (prophecy) is not exclusive to the Jewish people, other nations may claim that their prophets receive other messages or texts. A firm belief that Moses was different from them all will, therefore, prove the superiority of our Torah to their texts.