668 reputation
417
bio website
location Israel
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Apr 17 '12 at 6:25

I studied English linguistics and journalism at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
I worked for a while as a freelance journalist in English media in Israel and am currently a content writer and editor for a U.S.-based home improvement website.
I enjoy linguistics and grammar, and am especially intrigued by the translation of idioms, slang and metaphors.


Sep
25
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Sep
25
awarded  Yearling
Jun
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
20
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
25
awarded  Yearling
Jul
12
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
4
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
7
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
19
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
21
comment Is it idolatry to use the english word “God” to refer to Hashem?
To @msh210 and Gershon Gold, I'm interested to know where you guys are from that you pronounce god and gad differently. I'm from New Jersey and they're exactly the same for me. Do you pronounce the 'a' in "gad" like the 'a' in "hat"? Or do you not pronounce the 'o' in "god" like the 'o' in "hot"?
Dec
14
comment Fish Tank Menorahs
@avi, people lit outside but we don't know where. maybe there were walls around the area or they had some other setup. In general, at least in all the places I've lived, if you light a candle outside at night, it will usually go out within a few minutes.
Dec
14
comment Fish Tank Menorahs
@avi, the principle of "hadlaka oseh mitzvah" means that all the requirements (amount of oil, location, etc.) need to be there at the time of the lighting, and that it's not enough to light and afterwards meet the requirements. For example, if the menora has to burn for 30 min, you can't put in oil or 15 min, light, and then add more, since at the time of lighting it didn't meet the requirements. The fact that an unforeseeable event occurs after you light and blows them out doesn't matter as long as it was unforeseeable, and as far as you could tell the conditions were met when you lit.
Dec
14
comment Fish Tank Menorahs
you write "if they do go out, in this case you'd probably have to light again, since when you lit them they would probably be blown out." If you would put the candles outside without a box they would certainly blow out, if not immediately then within a few minutes. Everyone would hold that that lighting was no good. Just b/c it's not apparent until afterwards doesn't make it any less certain. The same is true if you don't put in enough oil. You don't see the fire go out until a few min. later when the oil runs out, but it was certain from the start that they wouldn't last long enough.
Dec
14
asked Glass boxes and Hadlaka Oseh Mitzvah
Dec
13
awarded  Benefactor
Dec
13
accepted Saying Kadish for someone else
Dec
13
comment Saying Kadish for someone else
2. When a person dies it can be viewed as void which may or may not need to be filled. But even if it needs to be filled, how does kadish do so? 3. Once again, the whole "decease's merit" thing. Do you have a source?
Dec
13
comment Saying Kadish for someone else
@Shalom 1. What do you mean by, "It's sanctification of G-d's name to help fill the void by one less person alive, and for the deceased's merit"? The only source I know which defines what a kidush Hashem (sanctification of God's name) is, is the Rambam in Hilchot Yesodei Hatorah. He does not mention kadish there, nor would it fit any of his criteria. If you have a source that says saying kadish is a kidush Hashem I would happy to hear about it.