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Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Unlike the normal case of saving a life which needs to be "lefanaynu" harming an animal can also be for a theoretical situation. What about the if the human benefit is "the person enjoys it"? Or other such bad reasons?
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
If you kill for a reason then your reason overrides the momentary pain the animal feels. Harming the animal (i.e. causing it pain, and not stopping the pain) is only allowed to save a human life.
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA No, I most definitely do not say that! You can only kill the animal if you have a reason.
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Of course pain should be minimized - that's the whole POINT of killing it - the pain is instantly stopped. The fact that is has momentary pain does not override your need to kill them.
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Harming an animal, without causing it pain (for no reason presumably) is not necessarily allowed. That would go under bal tashchit. The thing about killing the animal is the pain stops, it doesn't continue. We are mixing topics a bit: Do you mean harm/kill for a reason, or for no reason?
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Oops, looks like you edited your comment.
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Since when does the torah give you permission to harm an animal? (i.e. cause it pain, but don't kill it?) Actually only in one case: where it is needed to save a human life (medical research usually). But otherwise, no you do not have permission to do that.
Jul
27
comment Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
@DoubleAA Depends on how you do it - many deaths are instant, and they kill too fast for the animal to feel pain. In any case flies and mosquitoes do not have the ability to feel pain. Also, Tzar Balay Chaim implies unnecessary pain. If you need to kill the animal (and people have permission to kill animals) that is not included, as long as you do it as quickly as you can.
Jul
27
comment Rigging live worms - Tzaar Baalei Chayim?
@Dave "but it is not experiencing severe trauma, as an impaled worm presumably does" - worms can not feel pain, they do not have the nerves or brain for it. They are able to detect noxious stimuli (and try to avoid it), but to go from there to pain is a stretch. A simple test can be done with an ant: Cut off the leg of an ant, then let it go - it will continue walking like normal, with no indication anything is wrong. A mammal will never do this. Worms are even less developed than ants.
Jul
27
answered Tzar Balay Chaim- Killing Pests?
Jul
27
comment Is Metzitzah B'peh a must?
You may like this link: hakirah.org/Vol%203%20Sprecher.pdf Note: I have not read it yet. Note2: I think some of the above comments should have been answers instead.
Jul
26
comment Challah Loaves on Shabbat have a minimum size?
@Menachem Yes, still 55:5, there are no sources (at all), and I've transcribed it exactly. It continues with a discussion of making sure there is enough for everyone.
Jul
26
comment Challah Loaves on Shabbat have a minimum size?
@Menachem Thanks! Sorry I couldn't answer your question, but I did get an answer to mine :) (I've always wondered why.)
Jul
26
comment Challah Loaves on Shabbat have a minimum size?
@SethJ Menachem, I have transcribed the english text in my answer.
Jul
26
revised Challah Loaves on Shabbat have a minimum size?
added 149 characters in body
Jul
26
answered Challah Loaves on Shabbat have a minimum size?
Jul
25
revised What bracha would the fruit of a parasitic plant be? (Or the plant itself.)
added 104 characters in body; edited title
Jul
25
revised What bracha would the fruit of a parasitic plant be? (Or the plant itself.)
added 110 characters in body; edited title
Jul
25
suggested suggested edit on parshanut-torah-comment tag wiki
Jul
25
asked What bracha would the fruit of a parasitic plant be? (Or the plant itself.)