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seen Sep 10 at 16:52

May
13
answered Why do we still even try to do Sheluach HaKan?
May
13
answered What if somebody says the Shem Hameforash?
May
12
answered I am or was a religious jew and purposely ate non kosher
May
10
comment are bionic abilities legal for shabbos
This answer could be improved with sources but I can't right now.
May
10
answered are bionic abilities legal for shabbos
May
9
comment Why is birkas kohanim in the masculine singular?
@DoubleAA That's a tefilla by Yermiyahu - it's not the exact word of Hashem. (And before you say it's a prophesy, except to Moshe, a prophesy is not given word for word by Hashem.)
May
9
comment Why is birkas kohanim in the masculine singular?
@DoubleAA OK. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
May
9
comment Why is birkas kohanim in the masculine singular?
@DoubleAA My source [for not changing the text] is one of my teachers - I asked this very same question, and this is the answer I got.
May
9
revised Why is birkas kohanim in the masculine singular?
added 1681 characters in body
May
9
answered Why is birkas kohanim in the masculine singular?
May
9
comment Shisha Asar Ushlosh Meyot - mi yodeya?
316 is an anagram for 613 the number of mitzvos :)
May
9
comment Are placebos permitted without telling the person they are getting one?
@MonicaCellio Nowhere in the question does it say "In the United States", it said "Does Judaism". I don't know why DoubleAA even brought up US law. And in any case it's not so obvious that it's required in the US anyway. When they do studies they will sometimes write the placebos name in some technical way hoping people do not know what it is without outright lying. And it's currently a big debate if doctors should be allowed to prescribe them - but anecdotally, they already do. It's not unusual for doctors to prescribe some pill that does nothing to someone with psychosomatic illness.
May
9
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
@DoubleAA It does do something: It makes the person believe it does something. This "nothing" is the only reason the person is buying it.
May
8
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
Are you sure bitul has to do with empirical measurement? CO2 from beer making is prohibited on Pesach - but there is no beer in there, only pure CO2. Reb Moshe Feinstein permitted Shellac because it is initially batel - yet it's afterward reconstituted and every bit of it is still there. (Never mind that many argue on him - the existence of this concept is what matters here.)
May
8
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
@Daniel Homeopathy claims it works that way. It doesn't. It's a placebo. It's very effective though - don't get me wrong, but it works because the person believes it works. But the question "are you allowed to make someone worse in order to [try to] heal them" is yet another good question - but the amounts used in homeopathy will never actually do that.
May
8
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
@Daniel I just posted it myself: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/28590/758
May
8
asked Are placebos permitted without telling the person they are getting one?
May
8
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
@Daniel Ask: "Does Judaism allow placebos where the person thinks it does something, and is thereby cured, even though the item does nothing. Is this gnevas da'as, or because it can help them it's permitted to mislead them this way."
May
8
comment Are homeopathic remedies kosher?
A davar ha-maamid can not be batel. It's irrelevant that the substance doesn't actually make a difference (because homeopathy isn't a regular medicine, it's a mental tool) - the person who makes it/eats it thinks it does, so in their eyes it's a davar ha-maamid.
May
8
comment Is it a greater mitzvah to return a lost item anonymously?
If you returned it anonymously the owner might think that someone had stolen it and was too embarrassed to admit it so returned it anonymously instead. It's probably better not to mislead the owner this way.