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May
22
comment Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
@Alex, I respectfully disagree. While it's true that there are different kinds of pressure, the same emotional phenomenon takes place, whether it's manipulation to do drugs at a party, or manipulation to bet illegally on a game, or manipulation to attend a church service, or manipulation to go to a Seder. It is still emotional manipulation of somebody via peer pressure to do something that they are clearly uncomfortable doing, regardless of how beneficial you think it is or will be for them.
May
22
comment Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
@Yoel, I did not intervene to prevent the offer from being presented, but once he had declined (more than once, actually), I felt confident that he was not going to be persuaded. My question is not on the mission or the motive, but on the strategy and execution. Is added pressure from a peer, regardless of how close, seen as an effective tool to convince someone to perform a Mitzvah like Tefillin? And is the risk of turning someone off by such an approach considered to be outweighed by the slim chance of success at that point?
May
22
comment Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
@Isaac I thought I had.
May
21
comment Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
@mochin see above.
May
21
comment Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
To clarify, I have been an ardent supporter of Chabad, both vocally and financially, for many years. I have been, almost exclusively because of the Tefillin Project. I was unnerved, however, at the student's attempt to coerce a perfect stranger into submission by using peer pressure. I'm not here to bash anybody. I'm wondering if this method has any support, either within the movement or without.
May
21
comment Do you have the right to burn your own books?
@mochin the question does not specify why the rabbis burned their own books. But, yes, this answer is not successfully addressing the question, nor is it reflective of historical fact.
May
21
comment Can the word “eitz” mean “a thought” in the Torah?
@eee, the right question is one that asks what you want to ask, not one that asks for support for an idea that you think might be the right answer to the question that you actually want to ask.
May
21
comment Do you have the right to burn your own books?
@mochin the former is not spelled out in the question or this answer.
May
21
asked Contemporary rabbinic views on social pressure to get people to do Mitzvoth
May
21
comment Do you have the right to burn your own books?
Chani, please back up your assertions, as @msh210 suggested. Also, please bear in mind that if someone (especially a Rav) is burning books, he presumably does not consider it to be holy. RaMBa"M's books were burned by the rabbis of his time, for example.
May
21
comment Can the word “eitz” mean “a thought” in the Torah?
@DoubleAA, I didn't think what was being asked was clear. Reading Hersh's most recent comments, I'm even more convinced that he is asking the wrong question. Hersh, I think you should reframe the question to focus on how TaNa"Ch (or the Torah specifically) addresses (or doesn't address) thought, and why. You can use your own idea as either a suggestion within the question or as a suggested answer.
May
21
comment Why do people say “God” in English and not “Gosh”?
@msh210, I read the comments. It seems Menachem and I interpreted the question similarly, though I still don't see how his answer relates.
May
21
comment What is the Halachah if someone lost an object despite efforts to protect it?
@IsaacMoses, I've changed the question to be less personal.
May
21
revised What is the Halachah if someone lost an object despite efforts to protect it?
De-personalized the question.
May
21
comment Why do people say “God” in English and not “Gosh”?
Yoel and @msh210, I vote to close, as it is impossible to tell what is being asked. It seems as though he is asking why people say one thing instead of another (which itself is not really on topic as far as I can tell), but even if that were on topic, the answer that was chosen does not address the question.
May
21
comment Can the word “eitz” mean “a thought” in the Torah?
The Yiddish Eitzos doesn't mean ideas. It's also not Yiddish. It is Hebrew, and it is the plural of 'Eitzah, which means advice.
May
20
comment What was wrong with the word Talmud?
I hate to be that guy, but how is this on topic? Sounds more like a question on Church history.
May
18
comment what are the limits of “mesira”?
@Alex, I realized I never tagged you.
May
18
comment Is swordfish Kosher?
@Minhag, probably Mesorah like everything else.
May
17
comment The Fanatic Badge
Is this a question about Judaism or about calendars and math?