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2152
bio website parsha.blogspot.com
location United States
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visits member for 4 years, 9 months
seen 2 hours ago

Not much to tell, at present.

Another website:

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2h
answered Does Devarim 17:12 refer to a recalcitrant litigant or a rebellious local judge?
4h
comment Where in the torah is contempt of court condemned?
I've created the question, and will hopefully answer it soon.
4h
asked Does Devarim 17:12 refer to a recalcitrant litigant or a rebellious local judge?
4h
answered Should Jepthah have sacrificed his daughter?
14h
comment Where in the torah is contempt of court condemned?
I can explain, but strikes me as something that should be a separate question. Explanation is lengthy
18h
comment Where in the torah is contempt of court condemned?
Avot is Mishnah. This tractate is often called Ethics of Our Fathers. so not biblical.
Jun
25
revised Is there “Torah Inerrancy”?
added other rabbinic figures, and discussed briefly the issue of whether Ibn Caspi should be considered a rishon
Jun
25
comment Is there “Torah Inerrancy”?
That is that he is not "accepted" in in the present day Orthodox world, not that he is not "acceptable". And that he is therefore outside the bounds of his article. That Shapiro is surprised Artscroll included him in Rishonim does not mean that he could not be deemed a Rishon, just that it is surprising that Artscroll would include him as a Rishon.
Jun
25
comment Is there “Torah Inerrancy”?
The footnote in question: "Being that the purpose of this paper is to show how scholars generally "accepted" in the Orthodox world differed with Maimonides' principles, I have deliberately refrained from mentioning the views of Narboni, Caspi, Albalag et. al. This was done in order to forestall the objection that these authors were anyway never regarded as representing traditional Jewish thought. (It is quite remarkable that Caspi has been given an entry in Artscroll's The Rishonim [Brooklyn, 1986] 178-79.)"
Jun
24
comment Praying on an airplane
thanks for the edit! I've now edited it further.
Jun
24
revised Praying on an airplane
expanded on the summary to give figures who said this, and that the concern was hillul Hashem
Jun
24
answered Where in the torah is contempt of court condemned?
Jun
15
comment What is the source of the 'elu devarim' text printed in siddurim?
orot.ac.il/publications/meorot/Pages/5771s-eilu%20hadvarim.aspx
Jun
14
comment During the time when the Sanhedrin was primarily Sadducees, would the average citizen that believed in the Oral Law have to listen to them?
But if they are basing themselves only on written law, then the pharisee knows they are erring and, according to the gemara, is prohibited from listening to them
Jun
14
comment During the time when the Sanhedrin was primarily Sadducees, would the average citizen that believed in the Oral Law have to listen to them?
The gemara there is talking about sanhedrin.the whole question about par heelem davar is by sanhedrin
Jun
14
comment During the time when the Sanhedrin was primarily Sadducees, would the average citizen that believed in the Oral Law have to listen to them?
No. Horayot is all about what happens if the sanhedrin err and one knows that they err.
Jun
13
awarded  Generalist
Jun
1
answered Where can one find information about common sense?
May
31
comment About what were rabbis ahead of the times?
Despite fallacious q, a good answer would first discuss ancient science to demonstrate that it cannot account for chazal's statement (even by analogy or extension), then present Gemara in Aramaic with accurate translation, then show how corresponds to modern science without kvetch or ambiguity (eg don't say mind produces semen becomes pituitary influences sperm production). So it is possible imho to offer a good A to this fallacious Q
May
31
comment About what were rabbis ahead of the times?
The question is fallacious, but answers which follow the pattern (meaning ignoring parts which are WRONG as "we don't know"), kvetching other parts against what they actually say (piles vs fat), and inserting modern explanations into ambiguous text (heart because they knew about blood pressure, rather than some mechanism which would be obvious even to ancient scientists) makes it more so. Most answers offered here are of this sort. I am pointing this out because you speak of kvetch into Aristotle. I don't think it a kvetch, but even if so, look inward, and outward thatperhapssimilar ifnotexa