67,915 reputation
177222
bio website none
location Keser Elyon
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Jul 28 '13 at 6:23
Graduate of Beis Medrash Oholei Torah and "Seven Seventy"; now a בעל הבית with ריחיים בצוארו but still trying to be עוסק בתורה

May
13
comment Do a mitzva for mashiach?
@msh210: it's my paraphrase of what I think the Rebbe is saying. See p. 59 of SGUM: כלומר שזה מה שנפעל לימות המשיח ותחיית המתים אינו דבר נפרד מענין הגלות, אלא הוא ה״צמיחה״, אשר ״צומחת״ מעבודת ה״זריעה״ בזמן הגלות. Further on that page: צריכה להיות ניכרת במעשינו ועבודתינו שבזמן הגלות, שזה ענין של ״תזריע״ שמביא את ה״צמיחה״, את הגילוי של משיח צדקינו. On page 60: אופן נעלה יותר הוא, שאצלו האחכה והקיוינו כל היום לגאולה שנרגש בכל יום בעבודת ה״תזריע״ שלו, אין זה רק שכל עבודה שלו תגרום מיד ״שיבא״, אלא שהגאולה העתידה הינה דבר אחד עם תוכן עבודתו — מכיון שביאת המשיח היא הצמיחה ובמילא השלימות של הזריעה שלו
May
13
answered Why are there no special mitzvahs of Shavuos
May
12
comment Do a mitzva for mashiach?
@Fred: thanks. I wonder, though (and I'm not familiar enough with R. Chaim's writings to know the answer): would he accept that learning in order to reach chayei olam haba is also considered lishmah? If so, then that's the very reason that Rambam gives (Hil. Teshuvah 9:2 and Hil. Melachim 12:4) as why "the wise men" wanted Moshiach - so that they would be able to study Torah more perfectly, to merit chayei olam haba. And in that case, the causation could flow as follows: one learns Torah in order to bring Moshiach, which will bring the ability to learn more, which will bring to olam haba.
May
12
comment What happens if the accused sotah doesn't consent to the ritual?
On the last point: only if she refuses to drink but still maintains her innocence. If she pleads guilty, then even after the erasure she still doesn't have to drink (Rambam, Hil. Sotah 4:6).
May
12
answered Do a mitzva for mashiach?
May
9
answered Would a replacement kohen gadol be anointed on yom kippur?
May
8
comment Midlife Name Crisis
@SethJ: thanks. Turns out it's not so simple; sometimes 30 days are needed, other times not. Here's a rundown of the various cases and opinions.
May
8
comment Why did it take so long to conquer and divide the land?
@DoubleAA: indeed, Seder Olam says that this was the date of the tekufah. (The footnote there references Avodah Zarah 25b - should be 25a, I think, which discusses this episode - although I don't see anything there about the tekufah.) It also adds that indeed the battles of Yericho, Ai and Giveon were all within three months.
May
8
awarded  Nice Answer
May
7
awarded  Nice Answer
May
7
answered Why did it take so long to conquer and divide the land?
May
7
comment Why did it take so long to conquer and divide the land?
@msh210: Seder Olam places the sun standing still (Josh. 10:12) on 3 Tammuz 2488, less than three months after the entry into Eretz Yisrael. So unless we assume that ch. 11 happened much later - which seems contraindicated by 11:1, which describes Yavin hearing about the (presumably recent) events - then yes, it sounds fair to assume that up to 11:15, at least, happened all within a very short timeframe.
May
7
revised Source of saying migdol / magdil in Bentching
incorporating stuff from DoubleAA's comments
May
6
comment Why did nobody succeed the Lubavitcher Rebbe?
@Fred: thanks. I know that the Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l referred many times to his predecessor as the נשמה כללית of the generation, and also to the Baal Shem Tov as such. (Tanya, Iggeres Hakodesh 29, also notes that a Jewish king is כללות כל ישראל and that therefore his fulfillment of his mitzvos is credited to them all.) I guess that by implication the same is true of the other Chabad rebbes, but I don't know for certain. (In any case, of course, that is not ח"ו to disparage any other leader, chassidic or not; even if one particular person is the "head," we still need a "heart," etc.)
May
6
awarded  Enlightened
May
6
awarded  Nice Answer
May
2
comment Why did nobody succeed the Lubavitcher Rebbe?
It is worth noting that the Rebbe did start a campaign in the mid-80s of עשה לך רב, "make for yourself a leader" (mashpia, in Chabad jargon). I think that even at the time, and certainly in retrospect, this was understood to mean that Chabad will continue in a more "decentralized" model. Indeed, in a sichah many years earlier the Rebbe foreshadowed this by quoting a story where the Tzemach Tzedek said, "There are my children [to succeed me]; further, the achdus of chassidim will bring them to Moshiach" - on which the Rebbe commented that the first option is gone, and all we have is the second.
May
2
comment Why did nobody succeed the Lubavitcher Rebbe?
@HodofHod: it maxes out at 99.
May
2
comment Why did nobody succeed the Lubavitcher Rebbe?
And @ShmuelBrin (second comment): I also don't get the impression that in most other branches of Chassidus they find this centrifugal tendency to be objectionable, whereas in Lubavitch - very likely related to the נשמה כללית idea - there is the feeling that there is supposed to be strictly דבר אחד לדור ולא שני דברים לדור, no matter how great the rebbe's other sons, sons-in-law and talmidim might be.
May
2
comment Why did nobody succeed the Lubavitcher Rebbe?
@ShmuelBrin (first comment): not entirely. The Rashab's will directs the Rayatz to say and explain Chassidus, to give himself over to the good of the chassidim, and to run Tomchei Tmimim. Reading between the lines - and חסידים זיינען קלוג - this indeed amounts to appointing him as rebbe, but the fact is (as described by R. Folye Kahan in his Shmuos Vesipurim) that the Rayatz resisted fully accepting the nesius in other regards - such as accepting pa"nim - for several months.