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seen May 26 at 23:31

May
22
comment How far do orthodox Jews go to avoid symbols that are superficially from other religions?
In an American chassidic school I know of, they certainly use normal plus signs. Not sure if this is on topic, but I have heard of some Orthodox Jews, particularly Chabadniks, avoid using the term "Saint" in American place names. For example, the Lubavitcher Rebbe corrected someone who had said "Saint Louis" (or something similar) and said "Simcha Louis" instead.
May
22
comment Are you allowed to drink coffee/water during any part of the prayers?
Once you have recited the blessing for Torah study you can have water or coffee or tea. So then, or right after the morning blessings and before you start pesukei d'zimra, would be a good time to imbibe. Not sure about the other times.
May
14
revised What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
added stuf
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
Since some authorities permit women to sing as part of a group singing a religious song, then forbidding that is a stringent opinion (not a chumra).
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
Even if one gets the psak that it's assur, the existence of other more lenient opinions, particularly for group singing of religious songs, is a good reason to be lenient for the sake of kiruv and shalom bayis. I assumed for the sake of the question that the Rav holds kol isha in collective religious singing to be assur, but not necessarily that the rabbi holds it must be avoided at all costs.) One can believe something is assur in the abstract yet follow a more lenient opinion under extenuating circumstances.
May
14
revised What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
added an exception
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
Even if she respects him and his Judaism then she could still be offended and turned off. But if he is reasonable sure it would not push her away then it could be OK to mention it sometime so she learns. I'll edit accordingly.
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
Well, many poskim permit one to invite nonobservant Jews to a Shabbos meal even if they would drive, because the special ambiance of a Shabbos meal often brings people closer to Yiddishkeit. Since singing is part of the typical Shabbos meal experience, then according to that logic, perhaps one should start singing even if the female guests will sing audibly. I don't understand why a wordless niggun would be preferable. I think it's obvious that following the most stringent kol isha opinion is not worth divorcing or ruining Shalom Bayis over.
May
14
answered What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
Apr
23
comment Status of Catholic saints in Judaism
chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/562222/jewish/…
Apr
15
comment The history of the Sephardic Chief Rabbi's outfit
Mashiach was traditionally used as a first name among many sephardim.
Apr
13
comment Which (if any) Rishonim ascribe to a haskafah of hashgacha pratis over everything?
@warz3 Not sure, but if you google the text you'll find the source in translation. I also remember reading similar statements in other chapters of that sefer.
Apr
13
comment Which (if any) Rishonim ascribe to a haskafah of hashgacha pratis over everything?
From Rabbenu Bachya: "His generosity is universal and His kindness is all-embracing, as written "The L-ord is good to all, and His mercies are on all His works" (Tehilim 145:9) and "Who gives food to all flesh, for His kindness endures forever" (Tehilim 136:25), and "You open Your hand and satisfy every living thing [with] will" This is brief, but still suggests Providence over all living things.
Apr
13
comment Which (if any) Rishonim ascribe to a haskafah of hashgacha pratis over everything?
Here's Rabbeinu Avraham: "[T]he bitachon incumbent upon all the religious people...is a firmly placed conviction and a genuine, heartfelt awareness that the natural causes and normal channels are directed by God's detailed will for each person, in every time and every situation." (Guide to Serving God, p. 213).
Apr
1
comment Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?
I don't agree with the reasons for putting this question on hold. There should not be too many answers, because few people have enough experience and knowledge to be able to answer all the questions. A good answer would not be too long, because all it would need is one sentence or so for each of the 22. For example, the answer to each of them could be something like this: 1) Everyone says this, and it is an obligation (see Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim XYZ:AB); or 2) Many say this, but it appears to be a optional, as it is not in Shulchan Aruch or its commentaries, and is not in all siddurim.
Mar
31
comment Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?
@NoachmiFrankfurt Maybe so, but this doesn't mean it's compulsory -- perhaps only some recite it? For example, I think most siddurim have mah yakar, but in the Koren Sachs siddur he says "some say" mah yakar, suggesting this is an optional practice.
Mar
31
comment Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?
@CashCow See the link
Mar
31
comment Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?
Thanks. I've also heard R' Soloveitchik was opposed to saying Yigdal.
Mar
30
comment Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?
No. People should answer if they feel like they know the answer to my question -- that is, whether everyone says each of the 22, whether some people do, whether they're considered an obligation and according to whom, etc.
Mar
30
asked Which parts of Shacharit are skippable, optional, or not universally recited?