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bio website education.msu.edu/search/…
location Ann Arbor, MI
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Aug 19 at 0:08

I am an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University, with a joint appointment in the Dept. of Teacher Education (in the College of Education) and the Program in Mathematics Education (in the College of Natural Sciences). My Ph.D (2009) is from the University of Michigan, and was a joint degree in Mathematics and Education awarded by the Mathematics Department and the School of Education.

My dissertation focused on the capacity of the secondary Geometry course to faithfully represent authentic mathematical values and practices, and the extent to which school mathematics can cultivate a mathematical sensibility in students. Current research interests include an analysis of the secondary "Algebra 2" course, and an investigation into the mathematics education practices of home-educated students.


Mar
5
comment Mosaic Law and ISIS
Also given that a strong majority of Muslims do not believe ISIS actually conforms to Islam and that their actions are plainly barbaric and wrong -- I am not sure why this is relevant for the question. Whether Jewish law sanctions the use of lethal force to stop ISIS does not depend on whether ISIS conforms to Islam or not, or how they are perceived by other Muslims.
Mar
5
comment Mosaic Law and ISIS
Does the same principle apply when the rodef is not a threat to you directly, but to others far away? In general I understand that the rodef law allows for extra-judicial killing precisely because the danger is imminent and there is no time to go through proper legal procedures. That does not seem to apply here.
Feb
25
awarded  Scholar
Feb
25
comment 7 girls fighting over 1 boy at the Sheva Brachot?
I know a Sephardic rabbi named Sasson Natan. youtube.com/watch?v=le0Amyaa5QY
Feb
25
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
That is exactly what I was looking for. Apparently I was off by one page (I thought it was on 14a). Many thanks!
Feb
25
accepted Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
Feb
20
awarded  Critic
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@Fred, let me see if I have the logic right: On 8b, we learn that s'farim can be written in any language, and Rashi explains that in that context "s'farim" means Torah, Nevi'im, Ketuvim. On 7a Rashi tells us that s'farim defile the hands. So may we infer that the word means the same thing in that context? If so, that would seem to imply that even in another language they defile the hands. That can't be right, can it?
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@Fred I don't disagree that is the implied meaning, I am just looking for a place where he states it explicitly.
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
I'm looking in particular for a clear statement that "kitvei kodesh" means "Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim." (As opposed to "only Torah" or "any written text with God's name on it").
Feb
20
asked Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
10
awarded  Supporter
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Surely in that scenario we would not say the cholent is still kosher?
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
In the hypothetical scenario you describe, if we say "the first spill ceases to exist in halakhic reality", so that each incident is considered de novo and we do not concern ourselves with the cumulative effect, it seems to me that carrying this to its (somewhat absurd) conclusion, we might imagine a very klutzy chef who spills the powdered milk not once or twice, but many, many times, so much so that the cumulative effect is perceptible (resulting in a change in color or flavor); but each individual spill produces no discernible change (the increments are too small to notice). [cont]
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Okay, I'll agree. So the issue at question is specifically pertaining to imperceptible mixtures.
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Yes, but the question is about both kinds -- no? That is, something may be nullified for different reasons and by different processes, but the question is about the ontology of nullified items. Do we say that they no longer exist, or merely that they have no halakhic significance? It may very well be that the answer depends on the type of nullification; the purpose of my comment was to try to tease that distinction out, if it exists.
Mar
31
awarded  Commentator
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
If you nullify any overlooked chametz on Erev Pesach, so that it is hefker and "like the dust of the earth", does that mean that if you find a crust of bread behind your sofa you can eat it on Pesach because it's been nullified and isn't chametz anymore?
Sep
30
comment Do Jewish hermeneutics include an analogue for repudiating the “argument ad hominem”?
Thanks for clarifying the title. I am sure there are many examples of ad hominem arguments in the tradition; I am wondering if the concept of ad hominem, as a n identified hermeneutical principle and/or fallacy, exists, and if so what it is called. Either repudiation or endorsement would be of interest. Regarding the tag, I wanted to tag this with "hermeneutics" but the system wouldn't let me create a new tag, so I went with talmud-gemara as the closest approximation I could find (admittedly not a very good one).