147 reputation
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bio website education.msu.edu/search/…
location Ann Arbor, MI
age
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen Oct 16 at 3:20

I am an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University, with a joint appointment in the Dept. of Teacher Education (in the College of Education) and the Program in Mathematics Education (in the College of Natural Sciences). My Ph.D (2009) is from the University of Michigan, and was a joint degree in Mathematics and Education awarded by the Mathematics Department and the School of Education.

My dissertation focused on the capacity of the secondary Geometry course to faithfully represent authentic mathematical values and practices, and the extent to which school mathematics can cultivate a mathematical sensibility in students. Current research interests include an analysis of the secondary "Algebra 2" course, and an investigation into the mathematics education practices of home-educated students.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
10
awarded  Supporter
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Surely in that scenario we would not say the cholent is still kosher?
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
In the hypothetical scenario you describe, if we say "the first spill ceases to exist in halakhic reality", so that each incident is considered de novo and we do not concern ourselves with the cumulative effect, it seems to me that carrying this to its (somewhat absurd) conclusion, we might imagine a very klutzy chef who spills the powdered milk not once or twice, but many, many times, so much so that the cumulative effect is perceptible (resulting in a change in color or flavor); but each individual spill produces no discernible change (the increments are too small to notice). [cont]
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Okay, I'll agree. So the issue at question is specifically pertaining to imperceptible mixtures.
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
Yes, but the question is about both kinds -- no? That is, something may be nullified for different reasons and by different processes, but the question is about the ontology of nullified items. Do we say that they no longer exist, or merely that they have no halakhic significance? It may very well be that the answer depends on the type of nullification; the purpose of my comment was to try to tease that distinction out, if it exists.
Mar
31
awarded  Commentator
Mar
31
comment Does nullification mean something no longer exists, or just that it has no Halachic significance?
If you nullify any overlooked chametz on Erev Pesach, so that it is hefker and "like the dust of the earth", does that mean that if you find a crust of bread behind your sofa you can eat it on Pesach because it's been nullified and isn't chametz anymore?
Sep
30
comment Do Jewish hermeneutics include an analogue for repudiating the “argument ad hominem”?
Thanks for clarifying the title. I am sure there are many examples of ad hominem arguments in the tradition; I am wondering if the concept of ad hominem, as a n identified hermeneutical principle and/or fallacy, exists, and if so what it is called. Either repudiation or endorsement would be of interest. Regarding the tag, I wanted to tag this with "hermeneutics" but the system wouldn't let me create a new tag, so I went with talmud-gemara as the closest approximation I could find (admittedly not a very good one).
Sep
30
asked Do Jewish hermeneutics include an analogue for repudiating the “argument ad hominem”?
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
@Gershon, the wording of the linked question does not mention Kaddish Yatom, but two of the three answerers seem to take for granted that is the context, as they refer to "those reciting kaddish", which doesn't make sense in the context of kaddish shaleim and chatzi kaddish. Also, my question is mainly about the historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag, which is not addressed in the other question at all.
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
@Gershon, did you even read the second paragraph of the question?
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
@Seth, can't remember. What's the minhag there?
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
Seth, this doesn't have the feel of a strict/lax distinction, nor of a knowledgeable/ignorant distinction. After all (as has been pointed out) there are variations even within Sephardic Orthodox congregations on this point. Regarding Prayer for the State of Israel, at my (Modern Orthodox) congregation everybody rises for that, as well as the prayers for the United States and the Israeli Defense Forces. When I lived in England, the norm in all Orthodox congregations was to rise for the prayer for the Royal Family. Are there places where one does not rise for such prayers?
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
DoubleAA, in the linked question the first answer (middle ranked) refers to "those reciting it", as does one of the comments on that answer, which only makes sense if we are assuming the context is Kaddish Yatom.
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
Monica, interesting! I wonder if this is a regional thing.
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
Also possibly worth mentioning in this context is that Chabad follows Nusach HaAri, but (at least in my experience) the minhag in Chabad is to rise for every kaddish.
Feb
8
comment Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
Actually I attended a Sephardic Orthodox congregation nearly exclusively from 1998-2002 and my recollection (which could be wrong) is that they rose for every kaddish. But I've edited the question to specify "Ashkenazic Orthodox" to avoid complicating the question. Since Conservative Judaism emerged out of an Ashkenazic context it would be odd if they adopted a Sephardic minhag, no? If this really does originate in an Ashkenazic/Sephardic difference then the "when" and "why" questions seem to be even more salient.
Feb
8
awarded  Editor
Feb
8
revised Sitting or Standing for Kaddish - historical divergence between Conservative and Orthodox minhag
Edited to add the qualifier "Ashkenazic" to make the question more precise.