Reputation
8,493
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
22 68
Impact
~142k people reached

Apr
29
reviewed Reviewed What is the Real Alter Rebbe Ksav?
Apr
29
comment What is the Real Alter Rebbe Ksav?
Welcome to Mi Yodeya. I think your answer will be better if you can cite to a particular authority from which you learned the story. Also, its always good to edit your answer to take into account the comments.
Apr
29
comment Is there any evidence that Rabbi Akiva's students fought alongside Bar Kochba?
It is hard to choose between your answer and Jake's. Rabbi Dunner (and family) are very distinguished and unquestionably haredi. Therefore, if he is taking this position, I'm quite impressed. Apologies to Jake for changing my accepted answer.
Apr
29
accepted Is there any evidence that Rabbi Akiva's students fought alongside Bar Kochba?
Apr
29
comment Were there any sages who supported the Zealots during the seige of Jerusalem?
@ShimonbM: Goes to show that those who "learn" from history always believe that they are emulating those who had done it correctly the first time. Whether or not they do emulate the historic figures they think they emulate, is another matter.
Apr
29
comment Were there any sages who supported the Zealots during the seige of Jerusalem?
@ShimonbM I'm not convinced that it is that difficult. The issue of whether it is a Jewish obligation to hold the Land at all cost, or whether compromises can be met with an enemy, is as much a contemporary issue today as it was 2000 years ago. One would think that those taking sides on the debate today would look back to those days as well.
Apr
28
asked Were there any sages who supported the Zealots during the seige of Jerusalem?
Apr
28
comment Is there any evidence that Rabbi Akiva's students fought alongside Bar Kochba?
S. Freiman's "Who's Who in the Talmud" (Jason Aronson, Inc. 1995), cites the Sif. Beracha end 36 for the proposition that he was born approximately 50 years before the destruction of the 2nd Temple and lived for 120 years. The Bar Kokchba revolt started in 132. Assuming Freiman is right, that would make Akiva 112 at the beginning of the revolt, eight years before his death. And since the Yerusahalmi says he supported Bar Kochba, I'm assuming he must have been alive.
Apr
28
asked One Challah or Two?
Apr
26
reviewed Leave Closed Can we teach reading Hebrew without using the full names of the letters and vowels?
Apr
26
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
25
revised Sitting shiva for non-Jewish relatives?
Edited to respond to commentators.
Apr
25
comment Sitting shiva for non-Jewish relatives?
@Daniel I believe my answer addresses your point in the third paragraph -- if a convert can't sit shiva for a non-Jewish birth-parent because someone might assume he was Jewish, then certainly someone born of a mixed marriage cannot. I'll make that more obvious.
Apr
25
comment Sitting shiva for non-Jewish relatives?
@shulem I should have caught that -- I saw numerous sources for your point and didn't even think to caveat the answer for that situation. Edit made.
Apr
24
answered Sitting shiva for non-Jewish relatives?
Apr
23
reviewed Close Seeking examples of various gematria methods
Apr
23
comment Why does David say that he only sinned against G-d?
Isn't it relevant that, as king, David was within his rights to kill Uriah for any reason and take his wife, and therefore owed no apologies to humans; but it nevertheless offended G-d who expected more of King David?
Apr
22
revised Can a shul give an aliyah to an openly gay Jewish man when it gives aliyah to people who violate Shabbos?
Adding specificity to the opening sentence without revealing the identity of the shul or rabbi.
Apr
22
revised When did Matza become dry?
Edited to get the spelling for the living Hershel Schachter.
Apr
22
comment Men davening in the women's section while they catch up
it appears that the M.B. § 109, 1st halacha, says that one MAY "go into the courtyard" to daven shemoneh esrai if he would start too late to complete it before the baal tefilah backs out, OR wait for the repetition. I can see this as an advantage to the gabbai who is counting heads to give a go-ahead signal to the baal tefilah. But it seems to me that if the person who starts the prayer with the baal tefilah, but won't finish before kedushah is in a similar position. Why should we treat them differently?