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Apr
22
comment What was the earliest use of the Rambam's language in Shmita V'Yovel in support of kollel study?
@Mefaresh thank you! He uses it in support of the phrase "with zero hishtadlut". (Mind you, Rabbi Horwitz secluded himself for a lengthy period.)
Apr
20
comment Why do women wear ponytail elastics on Shabas?
You mean you see women wearing them outside an eruv, right? (The whole "outside an eruv" concept will seem outdated to many younger readers here.)
Apr
19
comment Early Sources that Charity Should Optimally Support Torah
I heard from a rabbi I highly respect that the Ramban writes that the purpose of the institution of maaser kesafim (tithing income) was to help Torah scholars. I'd have to search for the actual quotation.
Apr
17
comment Witnesses and the Ketubah
@Yoni agreed the best thing is to do one ceremony the right way. But plenty of non-observant people do all sorts of halachically sub-optimal things. If they insist on a non-halachic ceremony at the big party (e.g. without kosher witnesses), then the least-bad option may be to give them a quick, quiet halachic ceremony the day before.
Apr
17
comment Witnesses and the Ketubah
@msh210 if someone asks "can I use milk for my dalet kosos?" ... the underlying assumptions of the question had some things needed addressing.
Apr
16
comment Witnesses and the Ketubah
@DanF NO. They go to the rabbi's office and have kesubah, ring, chuppah. Halachically they are married. Then they go have a big party because they want a big party.
Apr
16
comment וְהִתְקִין לוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ בִּנְיַן עֲדֵי עַד Is the translation of מִמֶּנּוּ **His** very self or his very self?
Standard reading: "God made Adam, and then from Adam the woman who is a building for eternity." Sacks' reading: "God made humanity, and ... [thus?] a building for eternity. Yeah that's a bit of a stretch. (Note that other denominations change the blessing to "Who made us" for gender-neutrality.) Note, however, that the Chizkuni already says the translation of "Adam" is "human."
Apr
16
comment What is considered a Safek?
@DanielMoskovich fascinating but I don't think so. If the average human being doesn't KNOW with normal senses that A will cause B, then if he does A on Shabbos and B occurs, that's not called "thoughtful labor" (mileches machsheves). Using my normal human senses, I can't tell whether this bench will dig a hole. Contrast to checking my wine for spoilage or lettuce for bugs -- it's something I certainly could do, but the halacha says I'm not obligated to do so if the probability is sufficiently low. And the Talmudic precedent for that seems to be an objective one.
Apr
15
comment What is the hallachic definition of randomness?
@IsaacMoses entirely correct. I'm simply saying that our definition of randomness is defined by human senses. The question of whether you can rely on randomness to allow a situation of "I want X -> I push a button -> I visibly, tangibly get X" is a different one. (Rabbi Heinemann's "Sabbath mode" oven, for instance, has a random delay from when you push the button to when the heat increases, but even then the increase is not directly visible to the naked eye.)
Apr
14
comment Why separate verses for the camel, hare, and hyrax?
It keeps the baal kriah on his toes, he has to remember which are "hu" and which are "hee."
Apr
13
comment Books or Shiurim on practical divorce law/practice
for money, the rule of thumb is "hakol keminhag hamakom" or "keminhag hasocherim." There's an mp3 from Rabbi Reiss where he says that as long as they got licensed and legally married in a state that does equitable distribution, then the default assumption is that's how they will split their monies as well.
Apr
13
comment Books or Shiurim on practical divorce law/practice
Rabbi Hershel Schachter has said basically, the rule of thumb that most batei din apply is "equitable distribution" with regards to property, and "best interests of child" with regards to custody -- essentially the same principles that a secular court would use.
Apr
8
comment Kiddush Cup a Proper Wedding Gift for a Very Observant Couple?
Buy one with a flat bottom, not a stem, as many prefer to hold it in the palm, with the fingers cupped upwards.
Apr
7
comment Do Sefardim Eat Chametz-Like Food made from Fruit Juice?
That's flour + juice in less than 18 minutes. I'm not aware of anyone who follows the Rambam that you could do flour + juice + hours and hours.
Mar
23
comment For those that consider Chabad to be heretical, would a woman that received a Get from their Beis Din require another Get?
@warz3 group C invalid. Group B valid at least according to Rabbis Hershel Welcher, Hershel Schachter, and Yehuda Herzl Henkin. (That doesn't mean we recommend associating with Group B folks.)
Mar
22
comment For those that consider Chabad to be heretical, would a woman that received a Get from their Beis Din require another Get?
@warz3 All I can gather from what I've heard from Rav Shach is that Category B is incredibly dangerous and you should in no way associate yourselves with them. (Similarly, the RCA doesn't want rabbis in Category B.) That doesn't necessarily mean that their halachic actions are voided.
Mar
20
comment “Roasted on fire” does not equal “oven roast”. Why no “oven roast” for Seder?
@user6591 yes, it was decided to draw the line at "anything that needs kosher slaughter."
Mar
20
comment Downvoting someone you dont know
possible duplicate of Loshon HaRa and the down vote
Mar
19
comment Mishneh Torah Artwork
It's a well-known issue and can be found in some other books. See for instance these posts.
Mar
18
comment Why do we have Kosher L'Pesach quinoa but not buckwheat (kasha)?
@DanF Rav Moshe said there was no custom against peanuts where he came from, and if you knew of no family custom, you could eat peanuts. He was okay with an OU-P peanut oil, with the understanding that if your custom was to avoid peanuts, you wouldn't buy it. My understanding is that enough Jews had a tradition against peanuts (Rav Yitzchak Elchanan Spector did, and I think most Hassidim do) that it wasn't worth the OU's headache as too large a percentage of their clientele didn't accept it. I heard a rabbi from the OK say that personally he still eats peanuts on pesach.