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seen Oct 3 at 4:19

Mar
21
comment Effect of knockout on my soul
@Monica Cellio: I've been knocked out once in a bar scuffle. No injuries or anything. Don't even know how I got knocked out. That's the thing. Both a KO (which causes a concussion) and general anesthesia produce amnesia. You don't remember anything immediately prior to each event nor anything that occurs during that period. You will remember the time briefly before that, but nothing during. Fainting is a bit different depending on severity of hypoperfusion or hypoxia. I don't think anyone can conclusively say what is happening with the soul during that time.
Mar
21
comment Where did the Jews send the goat “for Azazel” while in the desert?
Count 33 verses from Lev. 16:8 which is the first verse in which the word עזאזל occurs, and you end up at Lev. 17:7 wherein it is written, "וְלֹא־יִזְבְּחוּ עֹוד אֶת־זִבְחֵיהֶם לַשְּׂעִירִם." Rashi writes that לַשְּׂעִירִם means לשדים. In short, עזאזל is a demon. That's the gist of it.
Mar
21
comment Where did the Jews send the goat “for Azazel” while in the desert?
But he, says, "There is no need, because the [goat] sent away is not a sacrifice, since it is not slaughtered. One may know the secret that is after the word עזאזל. You may know his secret and the secret of his name, because he has companions in scripture. And, I will reveal part of the secret to you by a hint. When you are thirty-three years old, you may know it." Why "33"?
Mar
21
comment Where did the Jews send the goat “for Azazel” while in the desert?
Prior to that particular comment, Ibn Ezra had listed various explanations from others of the word עזאזל, including the one that supposes it is a mountain, as mentioned above.
Mar
21
comment Where did the Jews send the goat “for Azazel” while in the desert?
ואין צריך, כי המשתלח איננו קרבן כי לא ישחט ואם יכולת להבין הסוד שהוא אחר מלת עזאזל, תדע סודו וסוד שמו, כי יש לו חברים במקרא ואני אגלה לך קצת הסוד ברמז, בהיותך בן שלשים ושלש תדענו. (Ibn Ezra, Lev. 16:8)
Mar
17
comment How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
@Seth J: Thank you for the correction. I wonder why Onkelos didn't use it in his targum? Or did he?
Mar
16
revised How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
deleted 1 characters in body
Mar
16
answered How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
Mar
3
comment Who is a gentile?
@Ali: He didn't say "goyim" (גויים). He said "Gentile." They're not the same word. One is Hebrew, i.e. גויים, and one is an English interpretation (i.e., translation) of the Hebrew, i.e. "Gentile." Actually, "Gentile," as far as the Bible is concerned, is more likely an English interpretation of the Latin gēns, which is an interpretation of the Greek ἔθνος (ethnos).
Mar
1
comment On what basis do we understand references to Orion and the Pleiades in Iyov?
@Monica Cellio: Yes, I understand. It seems that if we asked a fellow, "What is kesil," he may point to the sky and say, "That (group of) star(s) right there." "How do you know that," we ask. He might, then, say one of two things. He might say, "Well, it says 'Orion' right there, pointing to his English translation of the Bible." At which point, we'd say, "Well, how do you know that is correct? How did the translators know that kesil is equivalent to 'Orion'?" At which point, he'd probably say, in the voice of Tevye, "Tradition!!!!"
Mar
1
comment On what basis do we understand references to Orion and the Pleiades in Iyov?
@Monica Cellio: I see no reason for there to be any question about "Greek constellations." If you lived in 1000 BCE (i.e., long time ago) and were reading this verse, you wouldn't know anything of the Greek names of constellations. All you would know is that a certain star or group of stars in the sky is called kesil. I'm sure every culture gave names to the stars. Who doesn't look up in the sky and notice them? :)
Feb
20
comment Can jews eat unclean animals when blood is removed?
@Jim Thio: Yes. "The clean and the unclean" refer to the Israelites, while "thereof" (or, "of it") refers to the animal (which, of course, must be clean per Lev. 11; Deut. 14).
Feb
2
comment adoption and qualifying for being “officially” considered Jewish
@wberry: Do you have contact with the child's previous mother?
Jan
22
comment Learning Medieval Arabic
Well said. I do think one needs to learn Aristotle in order to fully apprehend many of the philosophers (including RaMBaM) of the Middle Ages (at least, when they write about theology and philosophy, and not simply writing commentary). And, that is an endeavor in its own right.
Jan
21
revised Who did Daniel see?
deleted 2870 characters in body
Jan
21
comment Who did Daniel see?
@ymar: They are the same word, but slightly different context. In Exo. 33:11, it says that God spoke with Moshe panim el-panim. This is clarified by the phrase "like a man speaks to his friend." Imagine how you speak with your friend. Thus, He spoke amicably to him, and panim el-panim could essentially be an idiomatic expression. However, in Exo. 33:23, G-d said that Moshe could not see His panim.
Jan
21
revised Who did Daniel see?
added 685 characters in body
Jan
21
comment Who did Daniel see?
The Hebrew word panim translated as "face" can also be translated as "presence." That would be like God's very essence.
Jan
21
answered Who did Daniel see?
Jan
20
answered Ibn Ezra's Arabic-based explanation of the vav heading some clauses