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Mar
13
comment What is meant by the term “midina”/“provinces” as in the 127 ruled by Ahasuerus?
I'm still unclear on what basis you say it's more likely there were so many distinct peoples per province. Also, the Megilla says there were Jewish populations in each of the 127 provinces, which seems an implausible thing unless it means something different, like maybe 127 cities that were specifically with Jewish populations?
Mar
10
comment What is meant by the term “midina”/“provinces” as in the 127 ruled by Ahasuerus?
On what basis do you assume Eber-Nari is typical in order to extrapolate that? If you lack information on 3 districts and get up to 71, Eber Nari appears atypical.
Mar
8
comment What is meant by the term “midina”/“provinces” as in the 127 ruled by Ahasuerus?
I suppose this is the best suggestion, but as I alluded to in my question, it's an uneasy one if you can't get all the way up to 127. Your excerpts cay maybe allow 80 or so divisions?
Mar
7
comment What is meant by the term “midina”/“provinces” as in the 127 ruled by Ahasuerus?
And by the way, as you can see from my question, I already was aware of the individual satraps representing more than one distinct people, just not whether that would get 20 up to 127. This would need to be expanded in your answer.
Mar
7
comment What is meant by the term “midina”/“provinces” as in the 127 ruled by Ahasuerus?
Interesting lead, thanks. Do you have additional examples and historical information to this effect, or is there any archeology from the time period referring to about 127 provinces? Just want to flesh out the difference between what 127 is very likely referring to compared with an idea based on an isolated example.
Feb
1
comment How to explain a specific phenomenon
@msh210 Sure, if you see ants taking away food, it's good to learn to be more diligent in your life. But whether there is a message behind everything, and how to understand those messages properly, would be a more general question.
Jan
31
comment Placing Tefillin on the floor
Where is the source prohibiting putting them on the floor? Perhaps that would provide details. Personally I would imagine it to be anything that people typically walk on. So a rug, but not a mattress.
Jan
31
comment How to explain a specific phenomenon
@yosef Having said that, my answer doesn't preclude, and it would be an interesting addition to see, someone else bringing a source of Rabbis discussing this. I personally am not familiar with any sources discussing such an "I noticed this thing twice" sort of thing. I have seen related things in the Gemara, though, that discuss meanings of signs in dreams and such.
Jan
31
comment How to explain a specific phenomenon
@yosef I understand what you mean. But people often suffer the fallacy of disproportionally reading into something simply because they don't understand it. Did you know about Baader-Meinhof before hand? My point is that as this is as a natural phenomenon as anything, you shouldn't assume there is more behind it than anything else, unless you have other details to add to your question that would give provide reason to say otherwise.
Jan
31
comment Why do Jews believe the entire Torah, as opposed to parts or most, was given by God to Moses?
Expressions like "this book of the Torah" also appear later, such as in Joshua 1:8, so places in Deut where it says that could also be referring to an external group of books besides Deut, as opposed to the Torah referring to itself. Maybe you can also say the lack of "And" in Deut 1:1 is an indication that the whole of Devarim is not part of the Torah.
Jan
25
comment Why do Jews believe the entire Torah, as opposed to parts or most, was given by God to Moses?
@AleksandrSigalov Okay, you're asserting beliefs, but you're not doing more to demonstrate why we need to believe that other than suggesting that the beliefs make sense.
Jan
24
comment Why do Jews believe the entire Torah, as opposed to parts or most, was given by God to Moses?
@sabbahillel How so? And it's funny, Ur Kasdim is known in Genesis by a name that it wouldn't have been known by until at least 600 years after the Torah was given. Maybe the same prophecy that let Abraham know his offspring would be enslaved also let him know the name of the town he ran to. Further, some mefrashim say the Edomite king list wouldn't have been known till after the Torah's time period but for prophecy.
Jan
24
comment Why do Jews believe the entire Torah, as opposed to parts or most, was given by God to Moses?
@Fred A break between Genesis and Exodus was just an example, you can apply my question to whatever section you want, starting a few chapters in to Exodus, after the first several chapters of Genesis, it doesn't matter. However: I would suggest a break could still be after Genesis. Deuteronomy and Joshua flow like they're the same book, for example. The Book of Esther starts with the word "And," and Lamech in Gen 4:23 discusses an unexplained event as though we already knew what he did.
Dec
25
comment Does Rambam take the 6 days of creation literally?
@RobertS.Barnes It sounds like you have the resource to add an answer, if you wish. The existing answer which basically says that it's unclear and possibly he wouldn't have been opposed to a non-literal reading could for sure enjoy the company of what you would have to say.
Dec
9
comment What is the basis that allows Rabbis to create laws?
Are you still planning on expanding your answer? It seems that you could incorporate from the Mishna Torah as per the other answer, and explain how everything comes together. I would prefer to mark the accepted answer to a single complete one.
Dec
4
comment Is the Talmud 100% Oral Torah?
Perhaps it contains a lot of the oral law from Moshe but also other things.
Dec
4
comment Why are Mordechai and Esther buried in Hamedan, considering it is distant from Shushan?
Especially when there are conflicting "traditions" as is the case with their burial location.
Dec
4
comment Why are Mordechai and Esther buried in Hamedan, considering it is distant from Shushan?
What is a "long time"? There is no record from 2500 years ago of that tomb. Does the Gemara say its location? I mean, look at the Cave of the Patriarchs. Some Monk found a burial cave (one of many in the area) with Herodian architecture in there, he decided it was the burial place of Abraham et al, wrote the names on the wall, and suddenly we all think they are buried there. What kind of evidence is that? They never studied the bones, did genetic analysis, and found an Abraham that was 180 and an Adam that was 15 feet tall. Beware the origins of "tradition" before you presume them true.
Dec
4
comment Why are Mordechai and Esther buried in Hamedan, considering it is distant from Shushan?
Why do you assume that that is their actual burial place? Do you believe the Muslims about the burial place of Moses as well?
Dec
3
comment What is the basis that allows Rabbis to create laws?
+1 because it basically answers my question. I would suggest a couple revisions though. You say we are explicitly taught to create a fence and in the same breath say as the verse implies. It's a little like in the case of Deut 17 where context is for a legal dispute but taken to have a broader application. Basically it sounds like for everything, the basis for the Rabbis to create laws is in how those Rabbis say those verses should be interpreted. As I have said, if this is the basis then I am still fine accepting it as an answer, but I just would prefer that your answer say so outright.