6,041 reputation
921
bio website mekubal.wordpress.com
location Jerusalem
age 36
visits member for 4 years
seen Jul 17 '13 at 22:25

Born in New Jersey, educated in Philadelphia, attained Semikha from Rabbinut in 2003, went on to become a Sofer, Mohel and Shochet. Currently studying Dayyanut and Kabbalah at Yeshivat HaMekubalim Nahar Shalom and Yeshivat HaMekubalim Beit El. Husband and father of four(for now).


May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
@msh210 Good point. I will, bli neder get to that when I get home from Yeshiva. Essentially you can't, because the reading of the Ketuba was instituted so that the husband understands what is written in the shtar.
May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
@DoubleAA Never said that he did. Just saying that the answer needs some work before it will get my upvote.
May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
@DoubleAA I don't see how that helps. Is there sourcing for this? No.
May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
@DoubleAA Yes the Teshuva of RMF says that however the answer itself exceeds the Teshuva of RMF and says"The questions come up when it's not widely known that the bride was divorced, widowed (very unlikely), converted, or had a non-Jewish boyfriend at some point." Without any sourcing whatsoever. If he stayed just with the words of RMF I wouldn't have a problem. However he didn't.
May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
@DoubleAA I agree with Shulem. The problem becomes that if the woman is later widowed, the Ketubah is what will be relied upon if she wants to marry a Kohen ect... There are several d'oraittas that one will be over for acting as though she is a Betulah when she is not.
May
8
comment Misreading a k'suva
I will try to find more sources.
May
8
answered Misreading a k'suva
May
6
comment Eating bread on Shabbos
Yeah just realized that... but I don't like messing with other people's questions.
May
6
comment Eating bread on Shabbos
@msh210 While I can't remove anything, I do think that they are three separate questions. Each one could receive a detailed answer with sources in halakha books, and touch on areas of minhag as well.
May
6
revised Ari Zal and Sefira
added 1242 characters in body
May
6
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
HOw do you deal with the Pri Eitz Chaim specifically stating that the reason for not cutting hair is in rememberance of Rabbi Akiva's students that died?
May
6
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
@Yehoshua I might be able to find them online. However the Haghaot and Biurim on the same page(ot Bet) says at the end ולכן לפי שמתו תלמידיו אסור להסתפר בימים אלו כו' עכ"ל So after giving the reason al pi sod, it gives the reason al pi pshat, which is that we are mourning for Rabbi Akiva's students.
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
@Michoel I don't see that. Kabbalists don't do weddings on Lag B'Omer either. It is more a matter of him not easing the restriction of haircuts on Lag B'Omer for Kabbalistic reasons. What you are positing cannot be backed up by sources, either within the text or amongst the Kabbalists that followed. What I am positing can.
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
That doesn't follow. Especially since he cut his son's hair against the ruling of the Beit Yosef.
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
What is your source for saying that cutting hair is not related to mourning?
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
Ok. The question was two parts. What is the source in the Kitvei for the haircuts. Was the Arizal equally strict with the other practices of mourning. I answered with the source. Then said that with the exclusion of Lag B'Omer the Arizal did extend the practices of the Omer for the entire Sefira. How does that not answer the question?
May
5
revised Ari Zal and Sefira
added 56 characters in body
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
@Michoel Meant after Lag B"Omer.
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
@Michoel You should note that on 87b he cut the hair of his young son on Lag B'Omer. Something which is technically against the Halakha, which says on the 34(not the 33rd as Rav Ovadia Yosef reminded me when I brought my son to him on the 33rd of the Omer for his first haircut). So it would appear that the question in the Kitvei is which mourning customs are lightened specifically on the 33rd and why? If he cut his own son's hair, it becomes more difficult to reconcile saying that hair cutting is independent of the other mourning customs.
May
5
comment Ari Zal and Sefira
@Yehoshua Added the sources in the Geonim and Rishonim.