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Nov
19
comment Which published Moreh Nevuchim would you recommend?
He means Rabbi Kafih's translation (the letter qof is pronounced 'g' in some locales).
Nov
19
revised Is the Ramchal's sefer Derech Hashem based on any particular Rishon?
deleted 3 characters in body
Nov
19
revised Is the Ramchal's sefer Derech Hashem based on any particular Rishon?
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
19
revised Is the Ramchal's sefer Derech Hashem based on any particular Rishon?
added 6 characters in body
Nov
19
answered Is the Ramchal's sefer Derech Hashem based on any particular Rishon?
Nov
18
comment Which published Moreh Nevuchim would you recommend?
Maybe you're right, ray. I personally don't remember them helping me, as a beginner trying to make sense of the sentences.
Nov
18
answered Which published Moreh Nevuchim would you recommend?
Nov
18
awarded  Critic
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
Thank you Double AA, good night
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
When we agree to that, for the purpose of communication between two people, we just rely for our purposes on a bad definition of the word God, and that's fine.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
There are things we can't grasp or express, can't formulate definitions for, can't name. I don't think there's anything else I could say. We could agree to disagree.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
The word 'God' in common usage designates a vague conglomeration of notions. Both for the Rambam and for the Kabbalists, if there is any notion at all attached to the word, then the word isn't referring to what it means to refer to. Not that as humans we can ever get there.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
That word "God" refers to an image in people's minds that is necessarily concretized, lowered, humanized, etc.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
Concepts certainly have boundaries. Magnetism encompasses certain notions, but is separate from others.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
By definition, if there is no end, how can it be designated? To designate, you are saying the subject has borders, there is that which is it, and that which is outside of it.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
When you call someone 'Frank' you necessarily have notions of him as: existing, being distinguishable from other entities, being present, etc., etc. None of these predicates are applicable to the En Sof.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
Is the question why can't it have names? We give names to things we some notion of. The Leshem adopts Maimonidean language to talk about this: all you can do is 'li-shlol', to negate from it any description.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
It's not a name, it's a statement: "There is no end." It means there's nothing we can say.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
If we can call God a name, then we are not talking to or talking about the En Sof, which can have no name. And in our religion we do call God names, so in this sense, it is possible to relate 'to God' yet to something 'lower than' the En Sof.
Nov
17
comment understanding tzimtzum k'peshuto
Maybe this discussion should be posted a separate question? Something like "how could Kabbalists justify talking about manifestations of divinity which are 'lower than' the En Sof?" Or, "How could Kabbalists justify talking about anything other than the En Sof when they talk about God?"